The Geocaching Blog


Ain’t no Mountain High Enough… for Geocachers – The Photo Album

Geocachers celebrate 15 Years of Geocaching by embarking on a grand #Geocaching15 adventure over the Alps

(Hier kannst Du den Artikel auf Deutsch lesen)

Last week we reported on three geocachers – Alexander Monsky (Berufsgeocacher), Tim Krüger (psycho_vm) and Benjamin Gorentschitz (MudMen_GER) – and their plans to cross the Alps on foot. Read the full article here.

After almost seven days and many miles they send us some of the highlights of their trip fixed on film. Enjoy their #Geocaching15 #GCTransAlps photo album below!

Post-Apocalyptic geocaching — Red Sands Fort (GC1DVNY) — Geocache of the Week

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Fort Red Sands Photo by geocacher Drsdoolittle

Fort Red Sands Photo by geocacher Drsdoolittle

Geocache Name:

Red Sands Fort (GC1DVNY)

Difficulty/Terrain Rating:

3/5

Why this is the Geocache of the Week:

Geocaching takes us to some pretty amazing places and can teach us the history of a location. This geocache takes you 8 miles out to see to a group of abandoned World War 2 era forts that were used to protect London from invasion. The history is incredible, but the view is what makes it worth it. Coming up to these forts evokes an almost post-apocalyptic feeling. The photos remind me of something I would read about in a zombie-survival novel. They’re quite creepy and awesome at the same time.

What geocachers have to say:

“Brilliant cache thanks for bringing me out here. Pics of course and a fav too. Unbelievable that this has only 3 favs so far! Don’t know what it must take for some people to fav a cache!!” – maattmoo

“Ive been after this ever since seeing it existed. Gutted that we didn’t think about the tide and as you can see from the photo, there was no way we were ever going to get on the platform. Out of interest, without any ladder in place is it ever possible? Great cache, which was almost touching distance away!” – Rhinoback

“Thanks for the cache – we are really pleased to be able to give Red Sands it’s 1st favourite point!” – The_Buffs

What the geocache creator, LostInTheWoods! , has to say:

A colleague and I travelled out on the X-Pilot boat. The skipper had arrange the trip so that we could easily access the landing platform. We viewed the radio station and my colleague met many guys that he had visited during his earlier Pirate Radio Chaser years. He recognised them, and they recognised him, immediately. All friends now, thankfully, or we may have had to walk a hastily erected plank. We then had an amazing tour of the WW2 Gun Platform, upper, level. Lovely views that day but not so lovely if you were being straffed by a WW2 figher way back in the 1940’s. It was here that we met the Fort’s sponsor. He was so keen to promote the existance of the Red Sands Fort that he eagerly accepted my request to place a geocache on it.
Like most cache owners, it’s always appreciated when I get detailed descriptions in Found its, DNFs, and Notes relating to this cache and all of my other caches.
I have certainly enjoyed reading all of the Red Sands Fort cache’s logs.
If you fancy going for this cache, make sure that you go properly prepared and check the tide times. Perhaps go as part of an organised group. Read the main page and logs to find out more.

Photos:

Close-up of one of the towers. Photo by geocacher  maattmoo

Close-up of one of the towers. Photo by geocacher maattmoo

50% creepy, 50% awesome. Photo by geocacher jimbo-ugk

50% creepy, 50% awesome. Photo by geocacher jimbo-ugk

Nearing the fort. Photo by geocacher palmercol

Nearing the fort. Photo by geocacher palmercol

What “unreal” places has geocaching taken you? Tell your story and post photos in the comments.

Continue to explore some of the most engaging geocaches around the globe. Check out all the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog. If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, just fill out this form. Thanks!

 

How to Find a Multi-Cache

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Nervous about finding your first Multi-Cache but tired of seeing that non-smiley spot on the map? 

 

Finding a Multi-Cache is a great way to uplevel your Geocaching game. Multi-Caches involve two or more locations, with the final location being a physical container with a logbook inside.

There are many variations to this idea, but typically you’ll visit at least two locations, or stages, to collect the information you’ll need to find the physical geocache container at the last stage. Watch this short instructional video for an overview:

1. Pick a Multi-Cache to find

We recommend starting with one that has Difficulty/Terrain ratings of 1.5/1.5 or lower. If you have your home coordinates set search for Multi-Caches near you now.

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2. Navigate to first set of coordinates

The spot where the Multi-Cache is shown on the map is the first set of coordinates, or the first “stage” of the Multi-Cache. Rather than finding the geocache container at this spot, you’ll have to figure out where the second stage or collect a piece of information that will help you find the final location of the geocache. How this is accomplished will vary from geocache to geocache, but these are a few common ways it’s done:

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The geocache owner may ask you to find a number, word, or other clue, which you’ll need to write down before moving to the next stage.

Example: The second number on the plaque at this location is the ‘X’ in the final coordinates of the cache: N 47° 37.38X W 122° 19.197

 

 

 

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You may find the coordinates for the next stage of the Multi-Cache hidden somewhere at the first stage.

Example: A sticker with the coordinates printed on it and hidden somewhere at this location.

 

 

 

 

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The geocache owner may provide the incomplete coordinates for the second stage in the cache description. You might then be required to count something at the first stage to fill in the blanks.

Example: Count the number of flags in front of the UN building to find the ‘X’ in the set of coordinates for the next stage: N 45° 29.468X W 114° 23.1543

 

 

 

 

3. Navigate to the rest of the stages of the cache

Once you’ve collected the information required at the first stage, you can move on to the next stage. Enter the coordinates for the next stages into your GPS, or if you’re using one of the geocaching apps, use the app to add a waypoint to the geocache and navigate to that.

If the second set of coordinates is not the final location of the geocache, you’ll again need to accomplish a task such as the ones described above.

Since a Multi-Cache has at least two stages, the second stage could be the final location of the geocache, where you’ll find the physical cache container. If that’s the case, you can sign the logbook, trade some swag, and do your multi-cache happy dance!

 

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Ready to find your first Multi-Cache? Download the free Geocaching app for iPhone, Android, or Windows Phone and go play!

 

 

Geocaching Road Trip ‘15 – Ain’t no Mountain High Enough… for Geocachers

Geocachers celebrate 15 Years of Geocaching by embarking on a grand #Geocaching15 adventure over the Alps

(Hier kannst Du den Artikel auf Deutsch lesen)

Twenty four hours ago, three hardcore geocachers started on the geocaching adventure of a lifetime. Combined Alexander Monsky (Berufsgeocacher), Tim Krüger (psycho_vm) and Benjamin Gorentschitz (MudMen_GER) from Germany have 14 years worth of geocaching experience under their belt. Benjamin (Benny) and partner Sandra write about their geocaching endeavors on the MudMen-GER blog.

Left to right: Alexander, Tim und Benny at the beginning of their journey in Obersdorf.

Left to right: Alexander, Tim und Benny at the beginning of their journey in Oberstdorf.

In the coming days the team will cross the Alps on foot following a trail of geocaches. The intense hike will take them on an almost 100 mile long path overcoming close to 33,000 feet of elevation.

When asked why they chose to embark on this journey, Benny explains: “Just like geocaching in general, it is our lust for adventure that drives us. To escape from everyday life and search for adventure is in our opinion a reason why millions of geocachers go out into the world in search for geocaches. Be it a climbing cache giving you an adrenaline rush, a multi drawing you in with a suspenseful story or a nerve-racking mystery—in the end its the adventure that gets us going.”

Ergo crossing the Alps on an ordinary path was not enough:  “[We] searched for a more interesting component to the trip. […] and finally found what [we] were looking for: ‘Rope teams’ and ‘Glacier crossings.’ Of course another component had to be finding geocaches on the way.”

View from Geocache GC12VH6 on the mountain Wildspitze the Geocachers will attempt to find.

View from Geocache GC12VH6 on the mountain Wildspitze the Geocachers will attempt to find.

The chosen path will include climbing two mountain peaks: Similaun and Wildspitze (each about 12,000 feet high) and crossing a glacier. Benny explains how they prepared for this extreme part of the trip: “ […] we completed a climbing and safety class and a search and rescue tour in an old mine. The choice of location might sound odd, but the large but the large rocks on the ground were similar to the conditions we expect to encounter in the alps.”

Benny, Alexander and Tim training for the Alp crossing at an abandoned mine.

Benny, Alexander and Tim training for the Alp crossing at an abandoned mine.

To celebrate 15 Years of Geocaching, they plan to drop Geocaching ‘15 SWAG* in some of the most amazing geocaches on their path.

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Geocaching ’15 SWAG*

Read about the special geocaches on their path and the full interview with Berufsgeocacher, psycho_vm, and MudMen_GER here.

Geocaching HQ will follow their trip and you can too. Keep an eye out for posts with #Geocaching15 and #GCTransAlps, and subscribe to the official Geocaching blog for updates.

Do you have a special journey planned to celebrate 15 Years of Geocaching? Let us know in the comments or tag your geocaching adventures with #Geocaching15!

 

*SWAG: “Stuff We All Get.” That includes the trade items left in caches by geocachers. You can find Geocaching ‘15 memorabilia in the Geocaching Shop here. (For international retailers click here.)

What’s Your Geocaching Road Trip ’15 Vehicle?


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