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7 Souvenirs of August

Mystery Cache

American Literature: Puritans

A cache by krymdog
Hidden : 3/2/2012
In Wisconsin, United States
Difficulty:
2.5 out of 5
Terrain:
2.5 out of 5

Size: Size: small (small)

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Geocache Description:

THIS CACHE IS NOT AT THE POSTED COORDINATES

The cache is at the following coordinates:

N. 46. AB.CDE   W. 091. FG.HIJ


I make my living by forcing students to analyze poems, short stories, novels, and other works of literature.  Why should you people be any different?

This series concentrates solely on American Literature.  American Literature can be broken down into eight unique time periods, each with its own identifying characteristics.  Arranged chronologically from earliest to latest, they are:

Native Americans
Puritans
Rationalists
Romantics
Transcendentalists
Realists
Modernists
Post-Modernists

Each of the eight American Lit caches will concentrate on one of these time periods.  Read the selected works and answer the questions.  The correct answers will generate the correct grid coordinates.

Note:  I’d do all eight caches before heading out, as all the caches are located in the same general area.

In each of the eight American Lit. mystery caches is a clue for the American Lit: Final Exam cache.   I encourage you to take your time with these solves and this series—read the selections to achieve understanding rather than skimming for the answers to the questions.  The answers will come with a thorough understanding of the material.  Remember—sometimes it’s the journey, not the destination, that’s important.  

The Puritans (1600-1750):

Seeking to escape religious persecution and the inherent corruption of the Church of England, the Puritans sailed to the New World in the early 17th Century.  Not only did they make their mark on American history, they left a repository of literature—mostly practical or devotional essays, as well as some pretty comprehensive historical records.
William Bradford and John Smith’s respective narratives recount the settling of this then uncharted territory in detail.

Jonathan Edwards was probably the most famous Puritan minister to come out of the Great Awakening of the mid 18th Century.  While most of us were playing war and building snow forts when we were eight and nine years old, Edwards would build pulpits in his back yard and preach to his little Puritan buddies.  He entered Yale at age 13, and graduated four years later as the valedictorian of his class.  It is said that when he delivered his famous sermon, “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God,” his parishioners screamed in terror, imploring Edwards to grant them salvation.
Jonathan Edwards


from “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”

by

Jonathan Edwards

This is the case of every one of you that are out of Christ. -- That world of misery, that lake of burning brimstone, is extended abroad under you. There is the dreadful pit of the glowing flames of the wrath of God; there is hell's wide gaping mouth open; and you have nothing to stand upon, nor any thing to take hold of; there is nothing between you and hell but the air; it is only the power and mere pleasure of God that holds you up.

You probably are not sensible of this; you find you are kept out of hell, but do not see the hand of God in it; but look at other things, as the good state of your bodily constitution, your care of your own life, and the means you use for your own preservation. But indeed these things are nothing; if God should withdraw his hand, they would avail no more to keep you from falling, than the thin air to hold up a person that is suspended in it.

Your wickedness makes you as it were heavy as lead, and to tend downwards with great weight and pressure towards hell; and if God should let you go, you would immediately sink and swiftly descend and plunge into the bottomless gulf, and your healthy constitution, and your own care and prudence, and best contrivance, and all your righteousness, would have no more influence to uphold you and keep you out of hell, than a spider's web would have to stop a falling rock. Were it not for the sovereign pleasure of God, the earth would not bear you one moment; for you are a burden to it; the creation groans with you; the creature is made subject to the bondage of your corruption, not willingly; the sun does not willingly shine upon you to give you light to serve sin and Satan; the earth does not willingly yield her increase to satisfy your lusts; nor is it willingly a stage for your wickedness to be acted upon; the air does not willingly serve you for breath to maintain the flame of life in your vitals, while you spend your life in the service of God's enemies. God's creatures are good, and were made for men to serve God with, and do not willingly subserve to any other purpose, and groan when they are abused to purposes so directly contrary to their nature and end. And the world would spew you out, were it not for the sovereign hand of him who hath subjected it in hope. There are the black clouds of God's wrath now hanging directly over your heads, full of the dreadful storm, and big with thunder; and were it not for the restraining hand of God, it would immediately burst forth upon you. The sovereign pleasure of God, for the present, stays his rough wind; otherwise it would come with fury, and your destruction would come like a whirlwind, and you would be like the chaff of the summer threshing floor.

The wrath of God is like great waters that are dammed for the present; they increase more and more, and rise higher and higher, till an outlet is given; and the longer the stream is stopped, the more rapid and mighty is its course, when once it is let loose. It is true, that judgment against your evil works has not been executed hitherto; the floods of God's vengeance have been withheld; but your guilt in the mean time is constantly increasing, and you are every day treasuring up more wrath; the waters are constantly rising, and waxing more and more mighty; and there is nothing but the mere pleasure of God, that holds the waters back, that are unwilling to be stopped, and press hard to go forward. If God should only withdraw his hand from the flood-gate, it would immediately fly open, and the fiery floods of the fierceness and wrath of God, would rush forth with inconceivable fury, and would come upon you with omnipotent power; and if your strength were ten thousand times greater than it is, yea, ten thousand times greater than the strength of the stoutest, sturdiest devil in hell, it would be nothing to withstand or endure it.

The bow of God's wrath is bent, and the arrow made ready on the string, and justice bends the arrow at your heart, and strains the bow, and it is nothing but the mere pleasure of God, and that of an angry God, without any promise or obligation at all, that keeps the arrow one moment from being made drunk with your blood. Thus all you that never passed under a great change of heart, by the mighty power of the Spirit of God upon your souls; all you that were never born again, and made new creatures, and raised from being dead in sin, to a state of new, and before altogether unexperienced light and life, are in the hands of an angry God. However you may have reformed your life in many things, and may have had religious affections, and may keep up a form of religion in your families and closets, and in the house of God, it is nothing but his mere pleasure that keeps you from being this moment swallowed up in everlasting destruction. However unconvinced you may now be of the truth of what you hear, by and by you will be fully convinced of it. Those that are gone from being in the like circumstances with you, see that it was so with them; for destruction came suddenly upon most of them; when they expected nothing of it, and while they were saying, Peace and safety: now they see, that those things on which they depended for peace and safety, were nothing but thin air and empty shadows.

The God that holds you over the pit of hell, much as one holds a spider, or some loathsome insect over the fire, abhors you, and is dreadfully provoked: his wrath towards you burns like fire; he looks upon you as worthy of nothing else, but to be cast into the fire; he is of purer eyes than to bear to have you in his sight; you are ten thousand times more abominable in his eyes, than the most hateful venomous serpent is in ours. You have offended him infinitely more than ever a stubborn rebel did his prince; and yet it is nothing but his hand that holds you from falling into the fire every moment. It is to be ascribed to nothing else, that you did not go to hell the last night; that you was suffered to awake again in this world, after you closed your eyes to sleep. And there is no other reason to be given, why you have not dropped into hell since you arose in the morning, but that God's hand has held you up. There is no other reason to be given why you have not gone to hell, since you have sat here in the house of God, provoking his pure eyes by your sinful wicked manner of attending his solemn worship. Yea, there is nothing else that is to be given as a reason why you do not this very moment drop down into hell.

O sinner! Consider the fearful danger you are in: it is a great furnace of wrath, a wide and bottomless pit, full of the fire of wrath, that you are held over in the hand of that God, whose wrath is provoked and incensed as much against you, as against many of the damned in hell. You hang by a slender thread, with the flames of divine wrath flashing about it, and ready every moment to singe it, and burn it asunder; and you have no interest in any Mediator, and nothing to lay hold of to save yourself, nothing to keep off the flames of wrath, nothing of your own, nothing that you ever have done, nothing that you can do, to induce God to spare you one moment

How dreadful is the state of those that are daily and hourly in the danger of this great wrath and infinite misery! But this is the dismal case of every soul in this congregation that has not been born again, however moral and strict, sober and religious, they may otherwise be. Oh that you would consider it, whether you be young or old! There is reason to think, that there are many in this congregation now hearing this discourse, that will actually be the subjects of this very misery to all eternity. We know not who they are, or in what seats they sit, or what thoughts they now have. It may be they are now at ease, and hear all these things without much disturbance, and are now flattering themselves that they are not the persons, promising themselves that they shall escape. If we knew that there was one person, and but one, in the whole congregation, that was to be the subject of this misery, what an awful thing would it be to think of! If we knew who it was, what an awful sight would it be to see such a person! How might all the rest of the congregation lift up a lamentable and bitter cry over him! But, alas! Instead of one, how many is it likely will remember this discourse in hell? And it would be a wonder, if some that are now present should not be in hell in a very short time, even before this year is out. And it would be no wonder if some persons, that now sit here, in some seats of this meeting-house, in health, quiet and secure, should be there before tomorrow morning. Those of you that finally continue in a natural condition, that shall keep you out of hell longest will be there in a little time! Your damnation does not slumber; it will come swiftly, and, in all probability, very suddenly upon many of you. You have reason to wonder that you are not already in hell. It is doubtless the case of some whom you have seen and known, that never deserved hell more than you, and that heretofore appeared as likely to have been now alive as you. Their case is past all hope; they are crying in extreme misery and perfect despair; but here you are in the land of the living and in the house of God, and have an opportunity to obtain salvation. What would not those poor damned hopeless souls give for one day's opportunity such as you now enjoy!

And now you have an extraordinary opportunity, a day wherein Christ has thrown the door of mercy wide open, and stands in calling and crying with a loud voice to poor sinners; a day wherein many are flocking to him, and pressing into the kingdom of God. Many are daily coming from the east, west, north and south; many that were very lately in the same miserable condition that you are in, are now in a happy state, with their hearts filled with love to him who has loved them, and washed them from their sins in his own blood, and rejoicing in hope of the glory of God. How awful is it to be left behind at such a day! To see so many others feasting, while you are pining and perishing! To see so many rejoicing and singing for joy of heart, while you have cause to mourn for sorrow of heart, and howl for vexation of spirit! How can you rest one moment in such a condition?

Therefore, let every one that is out of Christ, now awake and fly from the wrath to come. The wrath of Almighty God is now undoubtedly hanging over a great part of this congregation. Let every one fly out of Sodom: "Haste and escape for your lives, look not behind you, escape to the mountain, lest you be consumed."

A.  According to Edwards, what is the only thing that keeps people out of hell?
    0. The hand of God
    1. Their good deeds
    2. Prayer
    3. Edwards himself

B.  According to Edwards, what do people mistakenly think keeps them out of
hell?
    3. The hand of God
    2. Their good deeds
    1. Prayer
    0. Edwards himself

C.  According to Edwards, what is the best way of avoiding God’s wrath?
    8. to hide
    1.  to be born again into Christ
    5.  to live a good and moral life
    2.  to give to the Church

D.  Who does Edwards say “would give anything” to be in his congregation’s position?
    8. Edwards himself
    9. Those who are already in Heaven
    0. Those who are already in Hell
    7. Members of other congregations
    


Puritans weren’t all fire and brimstone.  Here are a couple of poems by Puritan author/housewife Anne Bradstreet, the most celebrated female poet in American Literature until Emily Dickinson came around—200 years later!


Anne Bradstreet
“To my Dear and Loving Husband”

By Anne Bradstreet (1612-1672)

If ever two were one, then surely we.
If ever man were lov'd by wife, then thee.
If ever wife was happy in a man,
Compare with me, ye women, if you can.
I prize thy love more than whole Mines of gold
Or all the riches that the East doth hold.
My love is such that Rivers cannot quench,
Nor ought but love from thee give recompence.
Thy love is such I can no way repay.
The heavens reward thee manifold, I pray.
Then while we live, in love let's so persever
That when we live no more, we may live ever.

E.  Can rivers quench Bradstreet’s love for her husband?
    5. Yes
    7. No
    3. Maybe

F.  Would Bradstreet take an entire gold mine or “all the riches” of the East in exchange for her husband’s love?
    2. Yes
    3. No
    4. Maybe

G.  Why does Bradstreet hope that the heavens reward her husband?
    6. Because he has led a good life
    5. Because she herself cannot repay his love
    4. Because he has given her children
    7. Because he is already dead

               
“Upon the Burning of Our House - July 10th, 1666”

In silent night when rest I took,
For sorrow neer I did not look,
I waken'd was with thundring nois
And Piteous shreiks of dreadfull voice.
That fearfull sound of fire and fire,
Let no man know is my Desire.

I, starting up, the light did spye,
And to my God my heart did cry
To strengthen me in my Distresse
And not to leave me succourlesse.
Then coming out beheld a space,
The flame consume my dwelling place.

And, when I could no longer look,
I blest his Name that gave and took,
That layd my goods now in the dust:
Yea so it was, and so 'twas just.
It was his own: it was not mine;
Far be it that I should repine.

He might of All justly bereft,
But yet sufficient for us left.
When by the Ruines oft I past,
My sorrowing eyes aside did cast,
And here and there the places spye
Where oft I sate, and long did lye.

Here stood that Trunk, and there that chest;
There lay that store I counted best:
My pleasant things in ashes lye,
And them behold no more shall I.
Under thy roof no guest shall sitt,
Nor at thy Table eat a bitt.

No pleasant tale shall 'ere be told,
Nor things recounted done of old.
No Candle 'ere shall shine in Thee,
Nor bridegroom's voice ere heard shall bee.
In silence ever shalt thou lye;
Adieu, Adeiu; All's vanity.

Then streight I begin my heart to chide,
And didst thy wealth on earth abide?
Didst fix thy hope on mouldring dust,
The arm of flesh didst make thy trust?
Raise up thy thoughts above the skye
That dunghill mists away may flie.

Thou hast an house on high erect
Fram'd by that mighty Architect,
With glory richly furnished,
Stands permanent tho' this bee fled.
It's purchased, and paid for too
By him who hath enough to doe.

A Prize so vast as is unknown,
Yet, by his Gift, is made thine own.
Ther's wealth enough, I need no more;
Farewell my Pelf, farewell my Store.
The world no longer let me Love,
My hope and Treasure lyes Above.

H.  Why does Bradstreet claim that it was “just” that God chose to let her house burn?
    8. Because she was a sinner
    7. Because all of the stuff she owned was really God’s, not hers
    5. Because she hadn’t prayed enough to earn salvation
    6. She didn’t—she actually cursed God

I.   What emotion does Bradstreet chide herself for having?
    8. Jealousy at her neighbor’s goods
    1. Vanity for feeling sorry for herself because of her lost possessions
    0. Anger at God for burning her house down
    2. Trust that God would take care of her and her family

J.  What does Bradstreet mean when she says “My hope and Treasure lyes Above”?
    3.  She had all her money in the bank, so it’s o.k. that her house burned
    5. That at least her children escaped the fire
    6. That if she’s pious and works hard, she’ll eventually rebuild
    1. That she’ll eventually earn her reward in Heaven

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Last Updated: on 6/20/2013 9:51:48 AM Pacific Daylight Time (4:51 PM GMT)
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