Everything’s bigger in Texas—especially geocaching: an interview with Bigguy In Texas

Geocacher Bigguy In Texas may not be exactly who you expect when you hear her username. For one thing, she’s not a guy! Her username certainly reflects her big presence in the Texas geocaching community, though. With over 1,500 geocaches hidden and 133 Events hosted, Texas geocachers know her well.

Since 2022 is the Year of the Hide, we got in touch with Bigguy In Texas to discuss all things geocaching. Read on to learn how she got her username, her experience with the game, and advice for new cache hiders:

Geocaching HQ: What’s your background outside of geocaching?

I am a retired elementary physical education teacher and now work for Hallmark Cards as a Virtual Training Specialist. I guess you can say I am still a teacher because I train new Hallmark merchandisers on how to do the job.

Image by Bigguy In Texas.

HQ: How and when did you hear about geocaching?

A friend who lived too far away to visit told me all about it but said it was like “orienteering.” Well, I can’t orienteer myself out of a box, so I never really understood her excitement about it.

Years later, I was at a national teacher conference in Virginia Beach, Virginia, where she was doing a session on geocaching. Before class, we went out to find the nearest one and talked the entire 2/10 of a mile to it. When we got to a tree at the edge of a parking lot, she stopped and said, “Ok, we’re here!” I asked, “Where is the orienteering part?” “Oh,” she said, “this did it for us,” and she showed me her yellow and black E-Trex.

I am still mad at her for that!

HQ: What is the story behind your username?

Same time as above – I was so excited about geocaching and I was not really thinking about what to call myself – I just wanted to get started. I have a teddy bear (for over 40 years now) who comes with me when I travel. His name is The Big Guy (you can see him on my profile page) and I was trying to use that but it was already taken. I added the “In Texas” to make it work.

Unfortunately, that night I didn’t realize that in my haste that I included two spaces between the words. When I got back home to Texas and tried to log on, I could not get into the site! I had to contact HQ for help and they were the ones who showed me the error. They did do it very nicely!

To this day people are confused about the name as I am not a “guy.” I could change it easily now but I have chosen to keep the name. That was the long version.

The short version I tell people when they ask is – “I am the poster child for PAY ATTENTION TO WHAT YOU CALL YOURSELF,” and I say this while slapping my forehead!

Image by Bigguy In Texas.

HQ: What is your favorite cache(s) you’ve found?

I like them all! But a couple that come to mind are – Necropolis of Britannia Manor III – GC2B034 in Austin, TX and Five Star Hero – GCG5TD in San Francisco.

HQ: In your opinion, what makes a quality cache?

Something that is fun to find. Have fun hiding and that should make the finding fun!

HQ: What’s the best approach to creating a geocache?

Start with something easy, those are appreciated too! Then take what you have seen done and try changing it up. Think inside the box as well as outside.

HQ: What’s your favorite that you own? What was your inspiration for the cache?

Of course, I love them all, but for a very long time it was my first hide (A Cut Above – GCV0ZQ). It was a simple micro, but it was active from March 2006 to August 2020. No inspiration really, but it did spark my love of hiding caches.

Image by Bigguy In Texas.

HQ: You have a number of complicated and intricate caches. What do you find to be the most challenging part of cache maintenance?

Newbies not taking the D/T rating into consideration when searching for a cache. A high Difficulty rating, it is NOT meant to be found immediately. If you can’t find it, it does not mean it is not there. Also look at the ‘Attributes’ for direction. Sometimes they are too quick to post a “cache should be archived” log.

HQ: How many active caches do you currently own? How have you seen your hiding style change as you’ve hidden more caches?

As of today (June 7, 2022) I have 433 active geocaches. My hiding style has not really changed much. I started hiding the very same month I started caching because I couldn’t find anything. I thought, if I can’t find them, I might as well hide them. At least I will know where mine are!

I have several ‘series types’ that if you have found one of them, you pretty much know where to find the others. But I do like to change things up sometimes!

Image by Bigguy In Texas.

HQ: If someone reading this was looking for inspiration, what words of advice would you give them?

Variety is the spice of life and the coolest part of geocaching. Also, hide what you like and don’t worry about what others say or think. If you are having fun, that is what matters!

HQ: What is your favorite part of geocaching?

I love the variety of the game. There are so many facets – types of hides, challenges, events and also the world-wide community of like minded friends-to-be all over the world.


Geocaching would not be the same without cache hiders and their passion and creativity for the game. Year of the Hide is the perfect time to share your favorite cache hider with us. Let us know who in your community goes above and beyond on their cache hides and why they are so incredible.

Nikki is a Community Coordinator at Geocaching HQ. Her specialties include making cheesy puns, talking endlessly about coffee, and being the only Californian who enjoys rain. She is passionate about geocaching and loves that it brings communities together.