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Traditional Geocache

Nice beach (NWGCS)

A cache by Andycop Send Message to Owner Message this owner
Hidden : 12/27/2007
Difficulty:
1.5 out of 5
Terrain:
2 out of 5

Size: Size: other (other)

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Geocache Description:

Park at the end of Beacon's Way, see parking ref. Then walk along public footpath to the cache, which is sited on the footpath. The cache is one of our small ones with no pen/pencil, so please take one. Then you can return across the golf course via a wide hardstanding path heading to the clubhouse (reference point) to make it a circular walk. NB Look out for them flying golfballs [:O].
Please follow the signed footpaths.

Lovely beach which can be seen as you drive up/down the A55 .
The Conway Morfa (Welsh: Morfa Conwy) is originally a marshy-sand based spit, north of the western end of the modern A55 entrance to Conwy.
Attractive flowers such as Sea Holly and Sea Bindweed are on show in the summer. It is also home to the rare Belted Beauty moth and the Sandhill Rustic moth. The adjoining Conwy Bay is a site of European importance for its marine wildlife.

Known locally as "The Morfa" (Welsh, Y Morfa), it shapes the south side of the estuary of the River Conwy. Today a large sandy bay, which at low tide forms part of the extensive sandy beaches and mussel banks of Conwy Bay, Conwy Morfa has many developments on its land, including:
a large sandy bay, which also provides excellent fishing, and the Golf Club - possibly the first place people played golf in Wales.

Conwy Morfa Coastline (visit link)

When the conditions are right you can see the brave people paragliding from the hills or across the estuary at low tide, you can see the extreme sport of kite flying or kite buggying.
At high tide you will see the yachts and boats going up and down the estuary, and kite surfing.

Now you know how to get to it, but I DON'T advise swimming because the estuary and tides are dangerous .
This is a beach for all the family and it's dog freindly .

Excellent 180 degree views of the Great Orme and the Conwy Mountains on this walk to the cache, so do take your binoculars .

A bit of local history.
Mulberry Harbour
During World War II, the Allies realised that if they were at some point to invade Northern Europe, and oust the Nazi's, then harbours were to be essential. They could not assume access to or the operation of the existing facilities, and they needed something that was quick and easy to assemble under enemy fire, that would survive the Atlantic storms. There is a debate as to who came up with the design for the Mulberry Harbour, but what is known is that a North Walian civil engineer Hugh Iorys Hughes was given the task of providing one of the competing designs - the one he had most input to. The prototypes were constructed at the Morfa, with the area transformed into a huge construction site and over 1000 labourers were drafted in. These included Olef Kerensky, son of former Russian Prime Minister Alexander Kerensky, who with his mother had fled from Leningrad at the age of 10 and entered the UK on a false passport: he supervised the construction process. Hughes constructed three 'Hippo' caissons which were towed from the Morfa to the test site Rigg Bay, Solway Firth near Garlieston, Scotland. When full production started, the main location was on a site behind what is now the second green, before being launched into the River Conwy estuary for their journey south and ultimately to play a key role in the D-Day landings. (visit link)

Thank you Deceangi/Dave for the info I was after.
The concrete walls are old Rifle Butts (disused).

Cogratulations to scottpa100 who was up and out early to be first to find this Geocache on the 29/12/07.

Nearby caches -
A55 Frustration No2 (visit link)

Additional Hints (Decrypt)

Pbagnvare ercynprq, abj nccebk. 2sg hc.
Cyrnfr ercynpr pnzb. pnershyyl.

Decryption Key

A|B|C|D|E|F|G|H|I|J|K|L|M
-------------------------
N|O|P|Q|R|S|T|U|V|W|X|Y|Z

(letter above equals below, and vice versa)



 

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Current Time:
Last Updated: on 1/27/2018 5:39:34 AM (UTC-08:00) Pacific Time (US & Canada) (1:39 PM GMT)
Rendered From:Unknown
Coordinates are in the WGS84 datum

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