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This cache has been archived.

DopamineNL: Indeed, the cache seems gone. Maybe it was the kids, maybe just an accident through regular gardening, it doesn't really matter anymore. It's gone.

The cache was a hollowed-out log of wood, which really is too much hassle to recreate. Goodbye!

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Amsterdam Trad's - GWL-terrein (former waterworks)

A cache by DopamineNL Send Message to Owner Message this owner
Hidden : 7/13/2011
Difficulty:
2 out of 5
Terrain:
1.5 out of 5

Size: Size: small (small)

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Geocache Description:



Welcome to Amsterdam!
City of charming canals, lovely parks and cheap entertainment. And of course: lots of geocaches! Although we are not as endowed as many other European or American cities, we do have our share of interesting caches for visitors from abroad. But beware: the Dutch love their micros, multis and mysteries!

Foreign visitor and wondering which caches to do? Check out: Amsterdam for (foreign) visitors. The ultimate English-friendly Amsterdam cache list!

Voor de Hollanders: deze achtergrondinfo is primair voor touristen. Niks zo irritant als op vakantie een cache willen doen en alle beschrijvingen zijn in het zweeds/portugees/etc. Jeweettoch! ;) De meeste bronlinks zijn wel Nederlands, en voor landgenoten die gewoon 's avonds thuis achter de pc kunnen gaan zitten staat daar nog veel meer en uitgebreidere informatie.




GWL-terrein

GWL-area
The GWL-area was the site of the former City Water Works: the Gemeentelijke Water Leiding. Since 1997 it’s a housing project that houses around 1500 people in 600 households. The GWL-area is an neighbourhood with lots of kids, high safety (bar the occasional lost tramp) and an predominantly left-wing liberal population. That last fact might have something to do with the ecologically durable nature of the place: it even has its own hydroelectric power station, the cooling waters of which heats the houses again! The rain and toiletwater is recycled, and the area is completely car-free. In fact, initially it was even deliberated to forbid inhabitants the possession of a car altogether!

History
The area started in 1851 as the service station for a 23km long waterpipeline originating in the dunes along the western coast. The water, previously hauled into the city by boat, was sold at 1 cent per bucket at the Haarlemmerpoort. When the use of water dramatically increased, a big reservoir and pumping station was build at this site in 1897. In the following 60 years a complex system of pipes is laid throughout the city, and this site grows to four reservoirs. While it was the far edge of the city when built, in 1989 the area had become valuable real estate in the middle of town, and the GWL moves away. Building of the current houses commences not long after, and in 1997 the first residents move in.


Above: aerial view of the current site. North of the GWL-area the 'gashouder' of the westergasfabriek is visible.

Left: the City Water Works still in service (before 1989), with 4 reservoirs showing (each approx. 10.000m3)


Landmarks
The site holds some nice heritage and major landmarks. By far the biggest is the Great Watertower. Build in 1966 it once provided the pressure for all the waterworks throughout the city. Nowadays it is still in service as a emergency water supply. The 'head' holds approximately 1280m3 water.
The small round building just north of the tower is where that pressure was controlled. It’s the Windketelhuisje. A group of local residents transformed this octagonal building into the smallest hotel of Amsterdam: it holds 1 fully furnished 3-room apartment of 48m2, with a garden. The large building just south of the tower is the machinepompgebouw, where the pumps used to be. It was built around 1900, and now holds the lovely Café Amsterdam. It also has a nice terrace that can be quite annoying when you’re trying to stealth the cache!
Directly north of the cache is Block 5. When you look up you’ll see an elaborate labyrinth of pipes and faces... It's art. By Paul Vendel. It's suppose to indicate “communication”. You can see it continue inside the adjoining rooms.


source: www.gwl-terrein.nl


The Cache

The cache-container is a small tupperware box with a magnet. Be careful for people on the terrace, the nearby tramstop and random folks sneaking up on you from around the corner. There is room for TBs and coins. Bring a pen.

FTF gets a 'gold' dollar.

Cache dimensions:

Additional Hints (Decrypt)

[en]Ybbx sbe n ybt haqrearngu gur urqtr (orgjrra gur gerr naq gur chzc).
[nl]Mbrx anne rra ubhgoybx baqre qr urt (ghffra qr obbz ra qr cbzc).

Decryption Key

A|B|C|D|E|F|G|H|I|J|K|L|M
-------------------------
N|O|P|Q|R|S|T|U|V|W|X|Y|Z

(letter above equals below, and vice versa)



 

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