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Traditional Geocache

Archimedes: A Principled Cacher

A cache by Ol'Fogie Send Message to Owner Message this owner
Hidden : 3/10/2012
In Tennessee, United States
Difficulty:
3 out of 5
Terrain:
1.5 out of 5

Size: Size: micro (micro)

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Geocache Description:



A small cache in an unusual container. Easy walk at the East end of the Papermill Bluff Greenway. Note that special equipment is needed to retrieve the cache from its hiding place! Log only - bring your own pen!

So you've found the cache location - now how do you retrieve it from its hiding spot? You'll need to think like Archimedes in order to solve this cache, which is hidden in plain view!

THERE IS NO NEED TO DISMANTLE THE CACHE HOLDER AND ATTEMPTS TO DO SO WILL HAVE THEIR LOG DELETED! DO NOT REMOVE THE OUTER CONTAINER FROM ITS HARNESSES!!!!! A WRENCH IS NOT THE SPECIAL TOOL!!! IF YOU'RE STUMPED PLEASE EMAIL OR CALL ME AND I WILL GLADLY GIVE YOU AN ADDITIONAL HINT! THE "SPECIAL TOOL" IS NOT SOMETHING YOU WOULD ORDINARILY HAVE IN YOUR TOOL BOX!!! BUT, to avoid the need for multiple visits, it is highly recommended that you decode the hint and prepare appropriately.


Archimedes Was A Principled Man


Easy, easy find - that's not the point...

Archimedes

Archimedes was born around 300BC and lived most of his life in Syracuse in Sicily. Very little is known about him or his life, but he may have spent some time in Alexandria, Egypt, and certainly communicated regularly with the great scholars of that city. His work in mathematics, technology, physics and astronomy earned him a great reputation both in his own time and beyond, and he is certainly considered to be the greatest mathematician of antiquity and one of the greatest of all time.

He used the method of exhaustion to calculate the area under the arc of a parabola with the summation of an infinite series, and gave a remarkably accurate approximation of pi. He also defined the screw pump bearing his name (the “Archimedes Screw”, a method of elevating water efficiently), formulae for the volumes of surfaces of revolution and an ingenious system for expressing infinitely large numbers.

Among his advances in physics are the foundations of hydrostatics, statistics and an explanation of the principle of the lever. He also described the principles of leverage in mathematical terms, and realized the full potential of the device. He is quoted as saying of the lever: “Give me somewhere to stand and I can move the Earth.”

He is credited with designing innovative machines, and part of his notoriety during his lifetime was earned from his development of machines of war, which successfully helped Syracuse defend itself during attack from the Romans. The most famous of these machines, “Archimedes’ Claw”, was a counterweighted lever with a grappling hook on one end: this machine was used to seize the bows of the Roman ships and hoist them into the air. When the boats were suddenly released, they would often be sunk immediately.

Eureka!


"Eureka!" is the expression supposedly used by Archimedes when he discovered his most famous principle. The story goes that he had been asked by his king, Heiron II of Syracuse, to determine whether a gold crown he had commissioned was made of pure gold. Or had the goldsmith pulled a fast one, and diluted the gold with silver? The crown was sacred, and so could not be destroyed, so how to find out if it was pure gold or not?

Allegedly the answer came to Archimedes as he enjoyed a common daily ritual. So delighted was he with the idea that came to him, he ran through the streets, naked, shouting the immortal word, which means “I have it!” What he had discovered later became called "Archimedes’ Principle". History does not relate whether the goldsmith was cheating the king or not, and what happened to him if he was, but the discovery has lived on.

Such intellect and yet he still forgot to get dressed before streaking down the streets of Syracuse... or so legend has it - Eureka!

Archimedes died during the second Roman attack on his home city. When the enemy ransacked the city after its fall, an unnamed soldier killed Archimedes whilst he was working despite orders that he should not be harmed. Archimedes is said to have instructed the soldier to “leave my circles alone!”


So you've found the cache location - now how do you retrieve it from its hiding spot? You'll need to think like Archimedes in order to solve this cache, which is hidden in plain view!

THERE IS NO NEED TO DISMANTLE THE CACHE HOLDER AND ATTEMPTS TO DO SO WILL HAVE THEIR LOG DELETED! DO NOT REMOVE THE OUTER CONTAINER FROM ITS HARNESSES!!!!! A WRENCH IS NOT THE SPECIAL TOOL!!! PLAY CORRECTLY AND ENJOY THE CHALLENGE. If you're stumped, PLEASE email me and I will gladly give you an additional hint. BUT, to avoid the need for multiple visits, it is highly recommended that you decode the hint and prepare appropriately.

Enjoy and happy hunting!
Ol'Fogie


TN Valley Geocachers

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Additional Hints (Decrypt)

uvwxyzab

Decryption Key

A|B|C|D|E|F|G|H|I|J|K|L|M
-------------------------
N|O|P|Q|R|S|T|U|V|W|X|Y|Z

(letter above equals below, and vice versa)



 

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Current Time:
Last Updated: on 11/15/2017 3:55:02 PM (UTC-08:00) Pacific Time (US & Canada) (11:55 PM GMT)
Rendered From:Unknown
Coordinates are in the WGS84 datum

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