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VS#1669 Fosdyke

A cache by LandMB Send Message to Owner Message this owner
Hidden : 07/28/2019
Difficulty:
2 out of 5
Terrain:
1.5 out of 5

Size: Size: small (small)

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Geocache Description:


About Fosdyke

The name derives from the Old English and Old Norse “fotrs dic”, meaning Fotr’s (a personal name) ditch, so clearly we have a long history as a village. In ancient times, Fosdyke often served as a port for Boston and the surrounding area. The land was hard loam and made good cattle pasture.

Fosdyke, has been a small port since at least mediaeval times. Silting has always been a problem and there are records of boats being hauled overland to Surfleet in the early C17th. Crossing the marsh hereabouts was hazardous too and only possible with a guide or by ferry until in 1812, construction started on a beautiful English Oak bridge to cross the river Welland and it was finished in 1815. This first wooden bridge was designed by Sir John Rennie. That was replaced in 1836 and another new iron one was erected in 1911. The present bridge dates from 1980. The river at Fosdyke is now used as a yacht haven and marina.

A small Coast Guard station was established here prior to 1900, manned by one officer and two men.

Although not mentioned in the Domesday Book, records go back to the 12th century (when King John is famously supposed to have thrown away his great treasure here), since when it has always had a reasonably busy port, the activities of which, together with agriculture, have been the mainstay of employment in the village until recent times when the old port and its shrimp fleet ceased to trade.

Today, the main source of employment is still agriculture and its associated food/flower/plant processing industries, so typical of South Lincolnshire, together with the activities of a rejuvenated port in the modern guise of a yacht haven.

In the 18th century this was a popular bathing resort for Sunday afternoon outings, treacherous though the waters were and are.

As with the churches, the ‘new’ bridge over the river Welland is the third. The lamp from a previous bridge now shines in restored beauty over the church path.

The puzzle

At the published co-ordinates, find the following information from the village sign (use the easterly side of the sign with the bus on it):-

The number of windows on the side of the bus = A

The number of trugs = B

How many wheels can you see on the vehicles = C

The number of boats on the river x 2 = D

What type of anchor is on the sign? If Fisherman E=2, if Danforth E=3, if Plough E=4

What is the colour of the tractor? If Red F=7, if Blue F=8, if Green F=9

There is a plaque at the base of the sign giving the name of a person. How many vowels are in his name? = G

The cache can be found at N52 (A-E)(F-C).C(G-G)D W000 (C-C)E.(F-B)(E+B)(G+E+B)

There is room in the cache for some small swaps and trackables.

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If anybody would like to expand the Village Sign Series, please do. I would ask that you let Smokeypugs know first at www.villagesignseries.co.uk so they can keep track of the Village Sign numbers and names to avoid duplication.

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Additional Hints (No hints available.)



 

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Found it 9     Publish Listing 1     

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Rendered From:Unknown
Coordinates are in the WGS84 datum

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