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Behind Enemy Lines - Bratton

A cache by The Bolas Heathens Send Message to Owner Message this owner
Hidden : 11/23/2006
Difficulty:
2 out of 5
Terrain:
1.5 out of 5

Size: Size: regular (regular)

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Geocache Description:


North Co-ordinates
These can be found by collecting the numbers in the Yellow level cache Rednal. Subtract 251 from this to get the correct northings.

West Co-ordinates
These can be found by collecting the numbers in the Yellow level cache Brockton. Subtract 103 from this to get the correct westings.

You are Heinz Beanz, a top secret German spy and your mission is to discover and report back on the British WW2 airfields of North Shropshire. As a spy, you will naturally be well versed in the recognition of British WW2 aircraft and have a smattering of morse code under your belt - you never know when you might need these skills!

To complete your mission, you will need to find a total of 13 caches, all near old WW2 airfields in North Shropshire. The caches are split between Yellow ("elevated"), Orange ("high") and Red ("severe") alert levels. The Yellow level caches give you the details needed to find the Orange level caches, which in turn give you the details to find the Red level final cache of the series.

This cache is on Orange alert level and is one of the caches needed to find the final cache in the series. We've included a chart which sets out the series and can be used to track your progress round the series.

Welcome to RAF Bratton. The landing ground was created on flat fields north of Wellington with the help of two circus elephants - Saucy and Salt! The elephants were used to pull out trees and hedges from the original site. They also pulled sledges full of debris cleared from the site. The landing area was opened in October 1940. Not long after, dozens of vehicles from local scrapyards were strewn over the area to stop a glider-borne invasion by the Germans. In the spring the field had dried out and so the scrap cars were cleared and the land flattened out using a local steam-roller and flying began.

The airfield was used as a relief landing ground for nearby RAF Shawbury, mainly using Airspeed Oxfords. The crews for training were brought in on a fleet of Midland Red buses. In January 1944 the airfield transferred to the control of RAF Tern Hill and Miles Masters used the airfield. It was also used by the Royal Navy from nearby RNAS Hinstock, otherwise known as HMS Godwit.

The co-ordinates are for near the entrance to the main camp. The buildings have largely gone apart from one with a large chimney that can be seen near the local saddlery (at roughly N52 44.045 W002 32.374). A large drainage ditch (pictured above) now bisects the site. Here is a map showing where the runway used to be.

North Co-ordinates
These can be found by collecting the numbers in the Yellow level cache Rednal. Subtract 251 from this to get the correct northings.

West Co-ordinates
These can be found by collecting the numbers in the Yellow level cache Brockton. Subtract 103 from this to get the correct westings.

 

Additional Hints (Decrypt)

hc gur onax, nobir oevpxf naq oruvaq n zrgny srapr cbfg

Decryption Key

A|B|C|D|E|F|G|H|I|J|K|L|M
-------------------------
N|O|P|Q|R|S|T|U|V|W|X|Y|Z

(letter above equals below, and vice versa)



 

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Rendered From:Unknown
Coordinates are in the WGS84 datum

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