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Details for Benchmark: LX4216

N 41° 11.258 W 073° 57.921 (NAD 83)

Altitude: 823

Coordinates may not be exact. Altitude is VERTCON and location is ADJUSTED. (more info)

Location:
In ROCKLAND county, NY View Original Datasheet
Designation:
HIGH TOR BEACON
Marker Type:
NGS Benchmark
Setting:
setting not listed - see description
Stability:

Reference Points

Must Read!

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The High Tor summit at 832 feet is the highest point of the Hudson Palisades. It is easily reached by the Long Path, blazed in aqua, which crosses the summit. The four steel/concrete footings for the beacon remain. In the bedrock, near the center of these footings is a square-shaped broken-off rod that was the benchmark control.

[Photos:]
photoLX4216
High Tor Beacon benchmark square-shaped broken-off rod in bedrock.
photoLX4216 - area view south
View to the south of High Tor Beacon benchmark. It shows the benchmark, in the foreground, and the southeast and southwest footings. In the center, it also shows the LX4218, High Tor Reset, reference mark 1 and the general location of that benchmark.
photoHigh Tor summit
View of the High Tor summit, looking north. High Tor Beacon and High Tor Reset benchmarks are in the center of the picture. The aqua blaze for the Long Path is also shown. The double blaze indicates a turn to the left.

Remains of the footings are visible, BUT the river views are GREAT

As LabRat said, the footing of the benchmark is still in place, and you can even see a circular area where the disc used to be, however it appears to have been stolen. The beacon is also long-gone, however the footings for that are still in place as well. Still though, it was nice to at least find the remnants of what once was.

The beacon is long gone, but the footings are still atop High Tor. I guess that counts.

Spotted while Geocaching

Please see the complete recovery, including text and photos, at my website: [b][url=http://surveymarks.planetzhanna.com/lx4216.shtml]LX4216 - HIGH TOR BEACON[/url][/b].

Zhanna

Documented History (by the NGS)

01/01/1932 by CGS (MONUMENTED)
DESCRIBED BY COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY 1932 (CAE) STATION HIGH TOR BEACON IS A TALL STEEL STRUCTURE SUPPORTING A REVOLVING AERIAL LIGHT AS WELL AS TWO FLIGHT LIGHTS. IT IS LOCATED ON THE HIGHEST POINT OF THE TALL PEAK JUST S OF THE VILLAGE OF HAVERSTRAW AND KNOWN LOCALLY AS THE TOR. NO MARKS WERE SET, HOWEVER THE CENTER OF THE TOWER IS MARKED BY A CROSS CUT IN THE ROCK AND TRIANGULATION STATION HIGH TOR IS 1.78 METERS FROM THE CENTER OF THE BEACON.
01/01/1964 by CGS (SEE DESCRIPTION)
RECOVERY NOTE BY COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY 1964 (CFK) THE STATION IS LOCATED ABOUT 1 MILE SOUTH OF HAVERSTRAW, ABOUT 1 MILE WEST OF THE HUDSON RIVER, AT THE TOP OF A BARE MOUNTAIN KNOWN AS HIGH TOR MOUNTAIN, AND ON THE PROPERTY OF THE PALISADES PARK. IT IS A U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS MAP CONTROL STATION. IT IS A 3 INCH IN DIAMETER BRASS DISK THAT IS NOT STAMPED, CEMENTED IN A DRILLED HOLE NEAR THE CENTER OF THE CONCRETE FOOTINGS OF THE RUINS OF AN AIR BEACON. TO REACH FROM THE JUNCTION OF STATE HIGHWAYS 59 AND 304 IN THE SOUTHEAST PART OF SPRING VALLEY, GO NORTH ON NORTH MIDDLETOWN ROAD FOR 1.7 MILES TO AN OVERPASS (PALISADES PARKWAY). CONTINUE NORTH ON NORTH LITTLE TOR ROAD FOR 2.05 MILES TO A CROSSROAD (HEMPSTEAD ROAD). CONTINUE NORTH ON NORTH LITTLE TOR ROAD FOR 2.5 MILES TO A CROSSROAD (SOUTH MOUNTAIN ROAD). CONTINUE NORTH ON NORTH LITTLE TOR ROAD FOR 0.8 MILE TO THE TOP OF A RIDGE AND AN IRON PIPE GATE ON THE RIGHT. TURN RIGHT AND GO EASTERLY ON A TRACK ROAD FOR 1 MILE TO AN ANGLING CROSSROAD. CONTINUE AHEAD EASTERLY ON THE TRACK ROAD FOR 1.25 MILES TO THE END OF THE TRACK ROAD. FROM THIS POINT PACK SOUTHEAST UP A STEEP BLUFF FOR ABOUT 0.1 MILE TO THE HIGHEST POINT OF THE MOUNTAIN AND THE STATION. A TRAVERSE CONNECTION WAS MADE TO TRIANGULATION STATION HIGH TOR 1851, THE DISTANCE BEING 5.84 FEET AND 1.780 METERS.

Control Text

  • The horizontal coordinates were established by classical geodetic methods and adjusted by the National Geodetic Survey in January 1999.
  • The NAVD 88 height was computed by applying the VERTCON shift value to the NGVD 29 height (displayed under SUPERSEDED SURVEY CONTROL.)
  • The Laplace correction was computed from DEFLEC99 derived deflections.
  • The geoid height was determined by GEOID99.