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Details for Benchmark: PE1782

N 44° 19.708 W 068° 10.475 (NAD 83)

Altitude: 33

Coordinates may not be exact. Altitude is SCALED and location is ADJUSTED. (more info)

Location:
In HANCOCK county, ME View Original Datasheet
Designation:
GREAT HEAD OBSERVATORY 1934
Marker Type:
NGS Benchmark
Setting:
setting not listed - see description
Stability:

Must Read!

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Found while enjoying perfect weather on the Great Head Trail hike.

found while geocaching in the park

Found this one while on a hike with troop436wtvl, indygeojones and luke geowalker during a camping trip in Acadia National Park. Great day, great hike, great location.

Rubble. But the ruins are still near the disks on the cliff.

[Photos:]
photoWhat's Left

This mark is gone! Everyone who logs it as found is just doing it for the numbers.

Found a few remnants of the tower

According to an article entitled "The Stone Tower on Great Head" by Gladys O'Neil in the Journal of Friends of Acadia and reprinted in "The Rusticator's Journal" (1993, Friends of Acadia), the observatory was actually a stone tea house tower built in 1915. The land (Great Head and Sand Beach) was bought by J.P. Morgan in 1910 as a gift for his daughter, Louisa Satterlee. The great fire of 1947 damaged the tower and destroyed the three nearby bungalows. Louisa Satterlee's daughter, Eleanor, donated the land two years after the fire to Acadia National Park. For safety reasons, what was left of the tower after the fire was torn down so that only the foundation remains.

The mark was most likely destroyed when the tower was taken down.

Found remains of what once must have been the tower.

found what was left of it. i belive this used to accualy be an old tea house/restaurant or atleat that is what i herd from a park ranger.

the mark is destrotyed though, i think it was done to mark the area fell more natural

Please see the complete recovery, including text and photos, at my website: [b][url=http://surveymarks.planetzhanna.com/surveymarks/pe1782/]PE1782 - GREAT HEAD OBSERVATORY 1934[/url][/b].

Zhanna

This entry was edited by Zhanna on Friday, 07 December 2012 at 03:00:10 UTC.

Tower has been destroyed post 1953 description and is no longer of use as a benchmark. All that remains is portions of the base.

[Photos:]
photoRemnants of Great Head Tower

Remains of Great Head Observation station destroyed and is a pile of concrete and Stone, Some steps still visible. The burned wood must refer to the Great Fire of 1947 that destroyed so much of that section of the Island

[This entry was edited by lostinflorida on Saturday, July 31, 2004 at 4:55:18 PM.]

[Photos:]
photoGreat Head Observation Station
Tis is all that remains of the mentioned station. There are still some steps visible

Found while doing virtual cache. What used to be a building is now a pile of stone and concrete with a few steps showing. It must have burned during the Great Fire of 1947.

N 44° 19.705 W 068° 10.478

The stone tower has been demolished, but its location is apparent as some of the stone floor remains and there is a lot of rubble on the site. This must have been a prime location for the rusticators to have visited during the old days of Mount Desert Island. A beautiful spot

Documented History (by the NGS)

1/1/1934 by CGS (MONUMENTED)
DESCRIBED BY COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY 1934 (KGC) THE OBSERVATORY IS A STONE BUILDING OF 21.15 METERS CIRCUMFERENCE AND 5 METERS HIGH AND SITUATED ON THE EASTERN SIDE OF MOUNT DESERT ISLAND, ON THE HIGHEST HEAD OVERLOOKING FRENCHMANS BAY.
1/1/1953 by CGS (SEE DESCRIPTION)
RECOVERY NOTE BY COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY 1953 (DFR) STATION WAS RECOVERED AS DESCRIBED. SOME OF INNER WOODEN STRUCTURE IS REPORTED TO HAVE BURNED IN 1947, BUT THE STONE TOWER REMAINS IN GOOD CONDITION.

Control Text

  • The horizontal coordinates were established by classical geodetic methods and adjusted by the National Geodetic Survey in March 1998.
  • The orthometric height was scaled from a topographic map.
  • The Laplace correction was computed from DEFLEC99 derived deflections.
  • The geoid height was determined by GEOID99.

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