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Details for Benchmark: QF0712

N 45° 09.509 W 067° 09.828 (NAD 83)

Altitude: 20

Coordinates may not be exact. Altitude is SCALED and location is ADJUSTED. (more info)

Location:
In WASHINGTON county, ME View Original Datasheet
Designation:
DE MONTS
Marker Type:
horizontal control disk
Setting:
in rock outcrop
Stability:

Reference Points

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After reading the previous log entry there's nothing more I could add other than I found the marker and disc and have photos.

I just got back from a very productive 5 days in Aroostook and Washington Counties in Maine. It was a very long drive (at least for the East Coast) - I accumulated over 1200 miles of driving in 5 days.

After bagging Peaked Mtn up in Aroostook, and then some stations and monuments along the North Line of the US-Canada boundary, I drove down to Calais on Monday afternoon. I was to be in Calais for 2 nights for the dedication of Meridian Park, at the site of the old Calais Observatory. While in Calais, I recovered 4 pairs of stations in my spare time - 1909 triangulation stations paired with 1921 IBC Reference Monuments.

[b]So what are these double survey marker stations?[/b]. All along the shore of the Saint Croix River, from it's mouth down in Robbinston up along the river into Aroostook County, the International Boundary Commission and it's Predecesssor the US and Canada Boundary Survey was tasked by the treaty of 1908 to define all the points in the Saint Croix river which constituted the boundary. This consisted of almost 1100 turning points - points in the river wherever the river made a turn - all the way from it's source in Amity in Aroostook County where the stream was but a trickle, down to it's mouth in Robbinston where it empties into Passamaquoddy Bay where it forms a broad stream between Maine and New Brunswick (and has 20+ foot tides). But none of these points is marked. They are out in the river, so they exist only on paper. They are virtual boundary points if you will. But in order to specify exactly where these points were, the shore line was carefully surveyed and hundreds of triangulation stations were put into place starting in 1909. These were usually disks, or sometimes drill holes in rocks. They used USC&GS old style tri-station disks (which had just come into use), since they did not have any disks of their own making till 4 or 5 years later, in the mid 1910s. Somewhat later (around 1912 or 1913) they produced a custom reference marker for this purpose - an 8 inch long bronze post suitably marked. There were a total of 245 of these put in along the US and Canadian shore lines of the St. Croix, starting with No. 2 near the source of the St. Croix to No. 246 down in Robbinston.

To save the cost of resurveying the whole river, they set these bronze posts right next to the 1909 tri-stations. Occasionally, when the older disk had broken off, they would simply put the newer marker right where the old disk had been. The first of these were set in 1913 near the source and In this area of the river the posts were put in place in 1921.

This is a nice pair of marks with the disk marking triangulation station "DE MONTS" (named for the leader of the 1605 French settlement on nearby St. Croix Island?) and the Reference Mark (No. 239) standing behind it. The marks are located on the public beach in the Devils Head Conservation area about 5 miles south of Calais.

[Photos:]
photoQF0712 DE MONTS, Calais Maine
photoQF0712 DE MONTS, Calais Maine
photoQF0712 DE MONTS, Calais Maine

Found it.®

Found by description. Right next to QF0717. No inscription on the disk.

[Photos:]
photoQF0712 Calais Washington Me Close Up
photoQF0712 Calais Washington Me Eyebolt
photoQF0712 Calais Washington Me View Downward
With QF0717 and cut letters U.S.R.M.
photoQF0712 Calais Washington Me R.H.T.
photoQF0712

Documented History (by the NGS)

01/01/1909 by IBC (MONUMENTED)
DESCRIBED BY INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY COMMISSION 1909 (JEM) ON THE S SIDE OF THE ST CROIX RIVER, A FEW METERS UPSTREAM FROM DEMONTS POINT WHERE THE RIVER TURNS SHARPLY FROM AN EASTERLY TO A SOUTHERLY COURSE, AND DIRECTLY OPPOSITE OAK POINT WHICH IS AT THE WESTERN SIDE OF THE ENTRANCE TO OAK BAY. THE STATION IS ON A SMOOTH ROCKY LEDGE 2.63 METERS OUTSIDE OF THE LINE OF VEGETATION, AND NEAR THE LINE OF EXTREME HIGH WATER. STATION MARK IS A BRONZE DISK SET IN A DRILL HOLE IN THE LEDGE. THE LETTERS---U.S.R.M.---ARE CUT IN THE LEDGE. THE LETTERS---R.H.T.--- HAVE BEEN WELL CUT IN THE LEDGE BY SOME UNKNOWN PERSON, THE LETTER ---R---BEING UPSTREAM 2.76 METERS FROM THE STATION. REFERENCE MONUMENT 239 IS SET BESIDE THE STATION MARK, 0.35 FOOT DISTANT. A CROSS WITHIN A TRIANGLE IS CUT ON THE LEDGE S 41 56 E, 5.20 METERS DISTANT FROM THE STATION, AND A LIKE MARK IS CUT ON THE LEDGE DUE W 5.07 METERS FROM THE STATION. AN EYEBOLT IS SET IN THE ROCK ABOUT 4.5 METERS WNW.
01/01/1946 by CGS (SEE DESCRIPTION)
RECOVERY NOTE BY COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY 1946 (NWS) THE STATION IS ON THE S SIDE OF THE ST. CROIX RIVER, A FEW METERS UPSTREAM FROM DE MONTS POINT WHERE THE RIVER TURNS SHARPLY FROM AN EASTERLY TO A SOUTHERLY COURSE, AND DIRECTLY OPPOSITE OAK POINT WHICH IS AT THE WESTERN SIDE OF THE ENTRANCE TO OAK BAY. THE STATION IS ON A SMOOTH ROCKY LEDGE, 2.63 METERS OUTSIDE OF THE LINE OF VEGETATION, AND NEAR THE LINE OF EXTREME HIGH WATER. THE STATION MARK IS A BRONZE DISK SET IN A DRILL HOLE IN THE LEDGE. THE LETTERS U.S.R.M. ARE CUT IN THE LEDGE. THE LETTERS R.H.T. HAVE BEEN WELL CUT IN THE LEDGE BY SOME UNKNOWN PERSON, THE LETTER R BEING UPSTREAM 2.76 METERS FROM THE STATION. REFERENCE MONUMENT 239 IS SET BESIDE THE STATION MARK, 0.35 FOOT DISTANT. A CROSS WITHIN A TRIANGLE IS CUT ON THE LEDGE S. 41 DEG 56 MIN E., 5.20 METERS DISTANT FROM THE STATION, AND A LIKE MARK IS CUT ON THE LEDGE DUE W 5.07 METERS FROM THE STATION. AN EYEBOLT IS SET IN THE ROCK ABOUT 4.5 METERS WNW.

Control Text

  • The horizontal coordinates were established by classical geodetic methods and adjusted by the National Geodetic Survey in March 1998.
  • The orthometric height was scaled from a topographic map.
  • The Laplace correction was computed from DEFLEC99 derived deflections.
  • The geoid height was determined by GEOID99.

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