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This cache has been archived.

SanMar: This should be archieved. I thought that we had archieved this a few months ago. That you Math Teacher for letting us know it wasn't on the archive list. We are going to make a cache somewhere else in the area-this kept getting muggled.

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Saddler's Woods

A cache by SanMar Send Message to Owner Message this owner
Hidden : 3/26/2006
Difficulty:
1 out of 5
Terrain:
2 out of 5

Size: Size: regular (regular)

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Geocache Description:

A small piece of wooded open space located in Haddon Township bordered by three different schools and some homes. Wide, easy trails to follow.

Container is a plastic container with log book and pencils. It is started with a regular deck of cards, flashlight keychain, tape measure key chanin, geocaching pin, hand sanitizer, Uno Cards and a box of Crayolas.
This is our first cache. After we found our 50th cache, decided it was time to try hiding one.

Here's a little history of the area. (visit link)

Saddler's Woods is a 25 acre urban forest located in Haddon Township, , New Jersey. Saddler's Woods surrounds the headwater spring of the main branch of the Newton Creek, a tributary of the Delaware River in Camden County, and is unique for its combined features of an old growth forest, young woodlands, and wetlands all located within five miles of Philadelphia, PA. Every year, thousands of visitors enjoy Saddler's Woods for passive recreation and nature interpretation.

The old growth portion is a time-capsule, showing visitors the type of forest that once existed when the Arowmen and Erinwonek tribes of the Leni Lenape nation lived here. In the early 1600s, European settlers began to arrive and the forests were cleared for farms, timber, and fuel. In the 1830s, Joshua Saddlers escaped a Maryland plantation to seek refuge among the large Quaker abolitionist population. Joshua Saddler found work with a local Quaker farmer, Cy Evans, and gained his freedom. He purchased a small farm and raised his family next to the woods. In 1868 Joshua Saddlers wrote into his will that none of his heirs "shall cut the timber thereon". For this preservation ethic, the woods, formerly known as the MacArthur Tract, were officially named in his honor in January 2004.

Additional Hints (Decrypt)

fgnl ba gur rnfg fvqr bs gur fgernz

Decryption Key

A|B|C|D|E|F|G|H|I|J|K|L|M
-------------------------
N|O|P|Q|R|S|T|U|V|W|X|Y|Z

(letter above equals below, and vice versa)



 

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Coordinates are in the WGS84 datum

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