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Lapporten

A cache by msen Send Message to Owner Message this owner
Hidden : 07/29/2009
Difficulty:
1.5 out of 5
Terrain:
3 out of 5

Size: Size:   other (other)

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Geocache Description:

To log this Earthcache you need to do this:
1. If you like, make a photo of yourself with your GPS in your hand up on Njulla, and Lapporten in the background. (Note that this only possible in clear weather)
2. Describe in your log what weather it is on Njulla and the temperature.
3. Make a drawing of Lapporten.
4. Take a photo of yourself on the site. (Not optional but but appreciated :)
NOTE: ALL INCOMPLETE LOGS WILL BE DELETED!

The Swedish mountains were formed about 300 000 000 years ago in a mountain chain pleating. Then big rocks with various minerals where put together over each other. This can make the minerals very variated. During the recent period in Earth’s history, Sweden got four different ice ages. Both in terms of the major lines and minor lines the inland ice has given the mountains their appearance. Ice erosion is caused by movement of ice, typically as glaciers. Glaciers erode predominantly by three different processes: abrasion/scouring, plucking, and ice thrusting. In an abrasion process, debris in the basal ice scrapes along the bed, polishing and gouging the underlying rocks, similar to sandpaper on wood. Glaciers can also cause pieces of bedrock to crack off in the process of plucking. In ice thrusting, the glacier freezes to its bed, then as it surges forward, it moves large sheets of frozen sediment at the base along with the glacier. This method produced some of the many thousands of lake basins that dot the edge of the Canadian Shield. These processes, combined with erosion and transport by the water network beneath the glacier, leave moraines, drumlins, eskers, ground moraine (till), kames, kame deltas, moulins, and glacial erratics in their wake, typically at the terminus or during glacier retreat. Cold weather causes water trapped in tiny rock cracks to freeze and expand, breaking the rock into several pieces. This can lead to gravity erosion on steep slopes. The scree which forms at the bottom of a steep mountainside is mostly formed from pieces of rock (soil) broken away by this means. It is a common engineering problem wherever rock cliffs are alongside roads, because morning thaws can drop hazardous rock pieces onto the road. In some places, water seeps into rocks during the daytime, then freezes at night. Ice expands, thus, creating a wedge in the rock. Over time, the repetition in the forming and melting of the ice causes fissures, which eventually breaks the rock down. In this way the inland ice has eroded the mountains and giving it there big U-shaped valleys – of wich “Lapporten” southeast of Abisko is classic example. When the inland ice later melted arose many different formations such as ridges, terraces and moraines.
On the plains below Vadvetjåkkabranten is a long, sometimes very high and steep ridge. In the mountains Vadvetjåkka is also an extensive cave system.

To log this Earthcache you need to do this:
1. If you like, make a photo of yourself with your GPS in your hand up on Njulla, and Lapporten in the background. (Note that this only possible in clear weather)
2. Describe in your log what weather it is on Njulla and the temperature.
3. Make a drawing of Lapporten.
4. Ta en bild av dig själv på platsen (Ej obligatoriskt men uppskattas :)

Additional Hints (Decrypt)

Znxr vg rnfl sbe lbh naq gnxr gur pnoyrjnl.

Decryption Key

A|B|C|D|E|F|G|H|I|J|K|L|M
-------------------------
N|O|P|Q|R|S|T|U|V|W|X|Y|Z

(letter above equals below, and vice versa)



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