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Traditional Geocache

Johns Homestead

A cache by RachelQuetzal Send Message to Owner Message this owner
Hidden : 3/9/2014
Difficulty:
2 out of 5
Terrain:
2 out of 5

Size: Size: small (small)

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Geocache Description:

You are looking for a circular tupperware container with room to hold small TBs and swag in a wooded area of Johns Homestead Park. Warning: The driveway up is steep and muddy! I practiced CITO after placing the cache, but look out for glass. There is a path to GZ near the outbuildings. No bushwhacking needed!


Welcome to Johns Homestead Park! This 50-acre park contains the farmhouse of John B. Johns, built circa 1830, and several outbuildings. There is also a public trail that leads to Twin Brothers Lake. The Johns family farmed this land, and future generations continued to live in the house until the 1980s. DeKalb County purchased the house in 2004, and plans to restore it as a civic area for the surrounding neighborhoods.

John B. Johns came to Tucker from Wilkes County, Georgia. This land was rewarded to Johns’ father for his service in the Revolutionary War. The farmhouse was originally built as two rooms around a central fireplace, but as children were born (seven in total), rooms were added to make space for the growing family. In early 2009, a large oak fell onto the house, destroying the additions and part of the wrap around porch. A lone fireplace and some concrete steps remain as clues that the house once had a larger footprint.

There are several outbuildings on the property. Most curious of them all may be the wood frame structure with a concrete shell made from clay mixed with lime and stones. This building served as the family’s walk-in cooler.

In the middle of the nineteenth century, the Johns family would have looked out upon open spaces from the doorway of their home. Today, drivers on Lawrenceville Highway look up at the farmhouse that seems out of place and wonder of its origins. 

Team Shurtle gets FTF bragging rights!

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Current Time:
Last Updated: on 9/14/2017 5:20:39 AM Pacific Daylight Time (12:20 PM GMT)
Rendered From:Unknown
Coordinates are in the WGS84 datum

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