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SideTracked - Pymble

A cache by fdsawq Send Message to Owner Message this owner
Hidden : 12/7/2018
Difficulty:
1.5 out of 5
Terrain:
1.5 out of 5

Size: Size: micro (micro)

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Geocache Description:


About SideTracked Caches

This cache belongs to the SideTracked series. It is not designed to take you to a magical place with a breathtaking view. It's a distraction for the weary traveller, but anyone else can go and find it too. More information can be found at the SideTracked Website

About Pymble Station


Pymble station opened on 1 January 1890 when the North Shore line opened from Hornsby to St Leonards. The present island platform and station building were completed in 1909 when the line was duplicated. It is serviced by the T1 North Shore line, and has bus connections to West Pymble, East Turramurra and beyond.

The station consists of 2 platforms sharing a single island, with access to the station from a bridge at the south-eastern end. There are a few shops on the south-western side of the station (near GZ), and many more on the north-eastern side, with a pedestrian tunnel under Pacific Highway. It ranks 77th in the network with about 3,150 daily users. Of course, being a commuter station usage is concentrated around the morning and evening peaks, hence be particularly muggle-aware at these times.

About Pymble

Pymble is named after Robert Pymble (1776–1861), an influential early settler whose 1823 land grant comprised some 600 acres, around half the land of the region. The other half (plus a large part of St Ives) was granted to Daniel der Matthew's, another influential settler who established the first sawmill in the area. The region was important to the early Sydney colony as a major supplier of timber for a wide variety of uses. The main timber varieties were blackbutt, stringybark, iron bark and blue gum. In later years it was also an important supplier of agricultural produce. It became widely known for the high quality of its produce and especially for its oranges which had been introduced to the area by Robert Pymble sometime around 1828 and which by later years were grown extensively throughout the region by numerous different growers following land sub-divisions.

Eventually agriculture and small farming gave way to residential development with residential sub-divisions commencing around 1879. The first bank - the Australian Joint Stock Bank - was established in 1888 in a then prominent house known as Grandview built on Pymble Hill ca 1883 by the son of local hotelier Richard Porter. Porter had opened the Gardener's Arms Hotel, also on Pymble Hill, in 1866. From this time the centre of commercial activity came to be at the top of the hill around the Pacific Highway and Bannockburn Road area, but with the railway station being located by necessity at the bottom of the hill development began to shift towards the new railway station at the foot of the hill. Pymble Post Office opened there on 6 August 1890.

Today Pymble is a predominantly residential area with tree-lined streets, many substantial homes and gardens, numerous parks, nature reserves, and active pockets of commercial activity.

At the 2016 census, the suburb of Pymble recorded a population of 11,051.

(source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pymble,_New_South_Wales)

Additional Hints (Decrypt)

Ebpxl Ebnq

Decryption Key

A|B|C|D|E|F|G|H|I|J|K|L|M
-------------------------
N|O|P|Q|R|S|T|U|V|W|X|Y|Z

(letter above equals below, and vice versa)



 

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21 Logged Visits

Found it 20     Publish Listing 1     

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Rendered From:Unknown
Coordinates are in the WGS84 datum

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