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Professor Xavier: As the owner has not responded to my previous log requesting that they check this cache I am archiving it.

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Ed - Professor Xavier

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Never at Sea - Grog

A cache by JollyJax Send Message to Owner Message this owner
Hidden : 03/22/2005
Difficulty:
1 out of 5
Terrain:
1 out of 5

Size: Size: micro (micro)

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Geocache Description:

The general theme for this gentle series of loosely connected caches is the sea, or rather the lack of it. There are many things around us that suggest that they should be in a more brine-laden setting than they actually are.

Vice-Admiral Edward Vernon is known as the father of grog. Vernon was a noted seaman, and victorious at Porto Bello. He was also a constant critic of the Admiralty and a supporter of better conditions aboard ships. His sailors gave him the name of "Old Grog" because of a waterproof boat cloak he wore. The boat cloak was made of grogam, a thick material which was a combination of silk, mohair and wool. Grogam was often stiffened with gum. By Vernon's time straight rum was commonly issued to sailors aboard ship - and drunkenness and lack of discipline were common problems. On August 21, 1740, Vernon issued an order that rum would thereafter be mixed with water. A quart of water was mixed with a half-pint of rum on deck and in the presence of the Lieutenant of the Watch.. In 1756 the mixture of water and rum became part of the regulations, and the call to "Up Spirits" sounded aboard Royal Navy ships for more than two centuries thereafter. On January 28, 1970 the "Great Rum Debate" took place in the House of Commons, and July 30, 1970 became "Black Tot Day," the last pipe of "Up Spirits" in the Royal Navy. Passing this shop reminded me of better days and “Any chance of Queens, Sir?” … but that’s another rum story for another day. The owner is more than happy for you to wave and even explore. Muggles on the other hand can be a problem here so please be careful. The container is a black 35mm film canister attached by magnets. There is a log but no pen or pencil, please bring your own.

Additional Hints (Decrypt)

haqre gur envyvat pybfr gb gur fubc sebag ba gur yrsg nf lbh ybbx ng vg

Decryption Key

A|B|C|D|E|F|G|H|I|J|K|L|M
-------------------------
N|O|P|Q|R|S|T|U|V|W|X|Y|Z

(letter above equals below, and vice versa)



 

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536 Logged Visits

Found it 479     Didn't find it 31     Write note 11     Archive 1     Needs Archived 1     Temporarily Disable Listing 3     Enable Listing 1     Needs Maintenance 6     Owner Maintenance 3     

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Rendered From:Unknown
Coordinates are in the WGS84 datum

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