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Help decide the fate of rediscovered APE cache!

Late last year, we announced the exciting news of how a group of Seattle-area geocachers rescued the muggled Mission 9: Tunnel of Light APE cache. We also offered the geocaching community an opportunity to suggest ideas for what should happen next with this renowned cache.

More than 9,000 geocachers responded to our survey! After considering all feedback, we have four options for the final vote. Now it’s time for you to decide the fate of Mission 9: Tunnel of Light. The idea receiving the most votes is the one we’ll implement. Simple as that!

Here are the ballot choices:

  • Return and Reactivate: Return the container to its original location and restore it to active APE cache status. It would be loggable throughout the year, although the unarchival date is to be determined.
  • Display at HQ: Display the APE cache container at Geocaching HQ as an important artifact of the game’s history. It would not be loggable as an APE cache, but would be assigned a special tracking number that could be logged only as a trackable with a unique trackable icon.
  • Activate Once A Year: Display the APE cache container at Geocaching HQ as a trackable for most of the year, and make it loggable as an APE cache at its original location only during the week of the annual Going Ape Mega-Event in Washington.
  • Traveling Artifact: Assign a special tracking number to the APE cache container and tour it to various events around the world. (It would be loggable only as a trackable, not as an APE cache.)

A few of these options would require exceptions to Geocaching.com guidelines. For example, it’s very rare for a cache to be unarchived, especially after a long period of time. However, this is an extraordinary situation for which we feel that exceptions can be made, especially with the support of a community vote.

The voting is open until March 5, 2017. One vote per person. Visit the ballot box here and make your voice heard!

Car challenge — Geocache of the Week

Traditional
GC593G5
by GeoCat
Difficulty:
2
Terrain:
3
Location:
Bulgaria
N 42° 10.933′ E 023° 15.386′

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.
-Robert Frost

The Dark Tower

To say this Geocache of the Week is reached by the road less traveled is an understatement. Located in eastern Europe’s Bulgaria, the cache is at the highest point reachable by car in the country. After crawling up the steep switchback, you will start the search for the appropriately named cache, Car challenge.

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There are several ways to approach the cache. By car, by foot, or by bicycle. Whatever way you get there will be quite treacherous because the road is both steep and very old. By car and bicycle, you must take a switchback road that was built during the Second World War. Warning: This location makes the World’s list of dangerous roads so please be prepared and take a reliable vehicle with you.

Lost Tower

The road was created to serve the construction of hydropower dams and reservoirs. The existing water reservoir (hint: the cache is nearby) is at the highest altitude in the Balkans (2,394 meters/7,854.331 feet).

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By foot, you can either walk up the same road or hike through gorgeous mountain scenery on a 3-5 hour hike. You can also stay overnight at the picturesque Ivan Vasov Hut, named after the famous Bulgarian novelist, Ivan Vasov.

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In the summer, the road serves as a track for cycling and running races. From the starting point just a mile up the road, there is nothing but you, the road, the mountains and the geocache on the summit. The cache itself is in great shape and has plenty of space for you to drop off or pick up a trackable at this breathtaking spot.

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Testimonials:

Unexpected TTF – Thank you for a very nice cache (especially in Bulgaria measures) in beautiful mountains of Rila. I came for it by Jeep as I would never use my own “ordinary” car, although I have seen some other people climbing up there with a Peugot 30, so I guess it could be done…. T4TC!!! 
Mur3na11

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Finding this cache came as a little bonus. We went to close the summer season with a 4 day route through Maliovitsa, Ivan Vazov, the Seven Rila Lakes and back. We left an entire day to hike around Ivan Vazov and decided to go to the peak. I borrowed a GPS to record our route of the entire vacation in Rila and when I looked at the screen I saw that there was cache I had never found. What a nice surprise! We took a trip to look for the cache and the search was crowned with success.
Thanks for the cache!
TFTC!
Emo & Nati
Emil Petrov

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By cache we reached the Ivan Vazov hut. The entire valley from the hut to the array of Kali is incredible. I recommend the pedestrian option, although the cache is dedicated to the road. Thanks for the great and well-packaged box 🙂
Hellla

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Continue to explore some of the most amazing geocaches around the world.
Check out all of the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog. If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, fill out this form.

6 steps to organize a Cache In Trash Out® (CITO) event

Save the Earth while geocaching? Yes please! We call it CITO (Cache In Trash Out®).

In 2017, geocachers around the globe will gather together during the weeks of April 22-30 and September 23– October 1 to pick up trash, remove invasive species, repair trails and more—plus earn a pretty sweet new souvenir. If you’ve never hosted a CITO before and you don’t know where to begin, read on! Here are 6 steps to get you started.

cito

1. Choose a location and a date

Since your CITO event will result in an improvement to a public space, pick an area that’s important to you and/or that needs special attention. Make sure you have permission to host the CITO from the local land manager. If you are unsure about which location is best, call a local park manager or geocaching organization. They can provide assistance and support in selecting the best location.

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2. Pick an activity

At it’s very basic, a CITO event should involve geocachers taking part in an activity that produces an environmental improvement to a park or another cache-friendly place. CITO activities have ranged from trash pickups, to tree plantings, to invasive species removals, to trail maintenance. Need inspiration and direction? Talk to the land manager to find out where volunteers are most needed. See if there are any local environmental organizations already doing volunteer work, with whom you can partner. Call your city’s Parks and Recreation department to find out if any city volunteer initiatives are planned.

kayak-cito

3. Fill out the cache submission form

Your CITO event will need to be submitted online at least two weeks before the date of the event. Give yourself a bit more time than that to square away any details.

  • Type & Location: Select Cache In, Trash Out as the event type, and enter the coordinates where your event will take place.
  • Waypoints (Optional): Is there parking near your event? A trailhead you need to find to get to the right spot? Let folks know.
  • Description & Summary: Where is the event, what time does it start and end, and what will folks be doing? Is any special type of clothing or gear required? Will there be activities suitable for young children, or do you have to be a spring chicken to partake? Will there be a lunch break? Any safety concerns? The more details you can supply, the better.

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4. Wait for the event to be published.

Once you’ve reviewed and submitted your event listing, your local Reviewer will likely publish the event or request changes to it within a week. If you don’t hear from your Reviewer, check to make sure the event listing is actually submitted and enabled. Check to see if the Reviewer has posted any Reviewer notes in the cache logs section. Once you’ve made any necessary changes, review and submit the listing once more. Feel free to ask your Reviewer for advice if you’re struggling with the event listing.

5. Once the event is published, let people know about it!

Is there a local geocaching organization you can reach out to, to let them know about your CITO? Maybe there are even some non-geocacher volunteer organizations you could recruit…the more the merrier!

Zug5

 6. On the day of the event…

  • Show up early.
  • Watch the cache page and your e-mail for last minute questions.
  • See to it that every person knows what the activity is, and how to do it.
  • Agree on a time and location to meet up and debrief at the close of the event.
  • After the event is over, keep the event listed long enough to allow people to log the event. Then write a thank you note, and archive it. Voila!

That’s all, folks! Remember: the CITO 2017 souvenir will be available for events during the weeks of April 22-30 and September 23-October 1, so if you’re planning to host an event that weekend make sure you submit the cache listing at least two weeks in advance, preferably more.

Processed with VSCO with g3 preset

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Hagen med det rare i— Geocache of the week

Letterbox Hybrid
GC51MPR
by thomfre
Difficulty:
1
Terrain:
1
Location:
Buskerud, Norway
N 59° 45.869′ E 009° 57.503

When daydreaming of Norway, one may think of fjord laden landscapes, snow-capped peaks, and the midnight sun. Norway is also home to over 5 million people, 72,080 active geocaches, and a thriving geocaching community. This Geocache of the Week, Hagen med det rare i, is located in the town of Steinberg along the Drammenselva river, one of the largest rivers in Norway.

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When you arrive in Steinberg, it won’t take you long to spot the remarkable garden filled with wood carvings, metal art and a Signal the Frog® lookalike.

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All of these distracting installations may increase the difficulty of finding the cache, including the large troll that guards the yard. In Norse folklore, trolls can sometimes be tricky and unhelpful to humans, so don’t let this troll trick you into going the wrong direction!

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Not only is the cache entertaining for geocachers and muggles alike, it also attracts LetterboxersLike geocaching, letterboxing is another form of treasure hunting that uses clues instead of coordinates. In this case, the cache owner has made their container both a letterbox and a geocache, making it a Letterbox Hybrid. These types of geocaches will contain a stamp that is meant to remain in the box and is used by letterboxers to record their visit.

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Of my 200-something hides, this is my personal favorite. The cache is located right outside my grandparents’ garden, a place I spent a lot of time when growing up.

Some of my earliest memories are from that place. And even though there’s some things that are as old as me there, there’s always something new to look at whenever I visit. I am thrilled that I get to share this awesome place with other geocachers! And the best part is that so are my grandparents! I might be a bit subjective here, but they are simply awesome!

I’ve received so many great logs, and I really enjoy telling my grandparents about all the nice words people write. Several people have noted that they see where I get my creativity from after visiting this cache. They’re so right! -Thomfre (cache owner)

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Thomfre, the cache owner is also very involved in the geocaching community with an interesting geocaching blog and a website that helps Norwegian geocachers to plan their next geocaching vacation.

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While visiting  family in Loesmoen we had to make the trip here. Exciting and fun garden with an ingeniously made geocache. Deserves all its blue bows. Fun that this was our first letterbox. Left our travel friend Reflexus, ready to embark on an adventure.—BråtenStabæk

A round after work to grab some caches in Steinberg and Hokksund with jonnyloe28 today. Today’s fourth discovery and our first letterbox. Parked at the zero point to mirror quickly heading to Hagen med det rare i. Wonderful garden and great installation. Certainly today’s highlight this here. Clear favorite points from me.Thanks so much for the cache. —supertoga1

On drive from Hamar to Vegglifjell and only time for one cache. The choice fell on this, and all your favorite points are well deserved! Great box, crazy garden, and now it has another favorite points. Thanks!—Schrøder


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Continue to explore some of the most amazing geocaches around the world.
Check out all of the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog. If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, fill out this form.

5 astuces pour que vos objets voyageurs réalisent leurs rêves

Mettez en circulation vos objets voyageurs !

Vous êtes prêts à accomplir vos résolutions de la nouvelle année. (Mettez un géocacheur dans la confidence pour qu’elles se réalisent). Maintenant, il est temps d’affecter à vos objets voyageurs une mission pour 2017.

Un objet voyageur est une pièce du jeu Géocaching qui voyage de cache en cache. En envoyant un objet voyager en mission, vous pouvez voir le monde à travers les logs et les photos d’autres géocacheurs.

Cinq astuces pour aider votre objet voyageur à réaliser sa mission :

  • Fixez un objectif pour votre objet voyageur. Vous souhaitez lui faire découvrir les Sept Merveilles du Monde ou visiter les plus belles plages du Brésil ? Tout est possible. (hormis visiter Mars… pour le moment.)
  • Expliquez clairement la mission sur la page de l’objet voyageur afin que d’autres géocacheurs puissent aider à la réaliser. Voici un bon exemple.
  • Avant de l’envoyer dans la nature, attachez à l’objet voyageur une version papier de sa mission. Ceci aide les géocacheurs à décider s’ils prennent votre objet voyageur ou s’il le laisse à une autre personne. Points de bonus pour la plastification.
  • Si votre objet voyageur reste coincé, envoyez un message d’encouragement à ceux qui le transporte – encouragement est le mot clé ici. Il est facile de contacter les autres joueurs en utilisant le Centre de Message.
  • Suivez l’avancement de votre objet voyageur sur l’application Geocaching®.

Débuter avec un objet voyageur.

Vous débutez avec les objets voyageurs ? Répondez au questionnaire sur les bonnes pratiques pour tester vos connaissances.