Make a muggle your valentine
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Guest blog from The Geocaching Junkie: Four reasons to make a muggle your valentine

We are featuring The Geocaching Junkie on our guest blog for Valentine’s Day.

 

Falling in love with a fellow geocacher might just be the epitome of finding the perfect partner for many cachers, and we have all heard stories of eyes meeting across a crowd at an event, and diamond rings hidden in ammo cans – the ultimate swag! Take German cachers reality666 and annimiles for example: they met at a geocaching event in 2012 and got engaged at Europe’s First geocache (GC43) in April 2016.

Unfortunately, since muggles (non geocachers—based on “muggle” from the Harry Potter series, which are non-magical people) outnumber geocachers by quite a margin, it’s unlikely that everyone can be lucky enough to be half of a geocaching pair. So what are the benefits of dating a muggle? I happen to be an expert on this subject, so here’s four reasons why having a muggle partner who supports your geocaching addiction has its own advantages!

1. They make excellent lookouts

Sure, they may not love poking their hands into places or generally getting their hands dirty, but their presence as lookout means that you can get stuck right in with your search without having to look over your shoulder every five seconds.

 

2. They’re good for security

As a singleton I rarely had any qualms about going geocaching alone, but FTF runs at night in the woods on my own? Not so much. A supportive muggle will understand why you want to go look for a lunch box in a tree hollow in the dark, and will accompany you for safety. It’s also good to have someone who knows where you’re going and will be concerned if you’re not home when you say you’ll be (it’s good common sense to have such a person aware of your movements, regardless of your relationship status.)

 

3. They can hold stuff for you

This could be the geocaching equivalent of holding your wife’s purse while she is shopping! I won’t even comment on how many times I’ve dropped the lid of a nano while caching alone (I’ve always found it, honest!). When my muggle is with me, he now holds out his hands to me out of habit and holds the container while I sign the log.

 

4. If all else fails, they will probably help you search for the cache

Even if it’s just so they can finally go home and have dinner, they are likely to help you search if you’re having trouble, and often will find it straight away—it’s amazing what a fresh pair of eyes can see, even in the same spot you’ve been searching for ten minutes!

While finding another geocacher to be your partner-in-crime might seem like the perfect scenario for a dedicated cacher, having a ‘snuggle muggle’ as your significant other is really not such a bad thing. Are you coupled up with a muggle or a geocacher, or are you still looking for the first to find your heart?

You can read more witty and adventurous articles from The Geocaching Junkie on her personal blog page: thegeocachingjunkie.com

Car challenge — Geocache of the Week

Traditional
GC593G5
by GeoCat
Difficulty:
2
Terrain:
3
Location:
Bulgaria
N 42° 10.933′ E 023° 15.386′

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.
-Robert Frost

The Dark Tower

To say this Geocache of the Week is reached by the road less traveled is an understatement. Located in eastern Europe’s Bulgaria, the cache is at the highest point reachable by car in the country. After crawling up the steep switchback, you will start the search for the appropriately named cache, Car challenge.

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There are several ways to approach the cache. By car, by foot, or by bicycle. Whatever way you get there will be quite treacherous because the road is both steep and very old. By car and bicycle, you must take a switchback road that was built during the Second World War. Warning: This location makes the World’s list of dangerous roads so please be prepared and take a reliable vehicle with you.

Lost Tower

The road was created to serve the construction of hydropower dams and reservoirs. The existing water reservoir (hint: the cache is nearby) is at the highest altitude in the Balkans (2,394 meters/7,854.331 feet).

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By foot, you can either walk up the same road or hike through gorgeous mountain scenery on a 3-5 hour hike. You can also stay overnight at the picturesque Ivan Vasov Hut, named after the famous Bulgarian novelist, Ivan Vasov.

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In the summer, the road serves as a track for cycling and running races. From the starting point just a mile up the road, there is nothing but you, the road, the mountains and the geocache on the summit. The cache itself is in great shape and has plenty of space for you to drop off or pick up a trackable at this breathtaking spot.

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Testimonials:

Unexpected TTF – Thank you for a very nice cache (especially in Bulgaria measures) in beautiful mountains of Rila. I came for it by Jeep as I would never use my own “ordinary” car, although I have seen some other people climbing up there with a Peugot 30, so I guess it could be done…. T4TC!!! 
Mur3na11

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Finding this cache came as a little bonus. We went to close the summer season with a 4 day route through Maliovitsa, Ivan Vazov, the Seven Rila Lakes and back. We left an entire day to hike around Ivan Vazov and decided to go to the peak. I borrowed a GPS to record our route of the entire vacation in Rila and when I looked at the screen I saw that there was cache I had never found. What a nice surprise! We took a trip to look for the cache and the search was crowned with success.
Thanks for the cache!
TFTC!
Emo & Nati
Emil Petrov

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By cache we reached the Ivan Vazov hut. The entire valley from the hut to the array of Kali is incredible. I recommend the pedestrian option, although the cache is dedicated to the road. Thanks for the great and well-packaged box 🙂
Hellla

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Continue to explore some of the most amazing geocaches around the world.
Check out all of the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog. If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, fill out this form.

Piz Palü 3901 m.ü.M. — Geocache of the Week

Traditional
GC5B9WM
by the Schnuppels
Difficulty:
3
Terrain:
5
Location:
In Graubuenden (GR), Switzerland
N 46° 22.715′ E 009° 58.152′

“Thousands of tired, nerve shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out going to the mountains is going home.” –John Muir

If you love extreme, you’ll love this GOTW. In Switzerland, a mountain cache sits at 3,901 m (12,800 ft). Home to 30,239 active geocaches, and more than 250 summits above 3,600 m, Switzerland is a haven for mountain caching. According to the cache owner, Piz Palü is one of the great treasures of the Alps. “You will experience here breathtaking views that you will never forget, because you have to earn it with endurance and skill. The entrance over the Pers glacier is only possible with crampons, pick axes, and ropes.” –the Schnuppels

The journey can be split up into 3 days per Cosley & Houston’s Alpine Guide.

Day 1

Start by riding the Diavolezza lift to almost 3,000 m. From here you descend to the Pers Glacier, cross this and ascend the Fortezza to the Bellavista Terraces. These are followed to the Marco e Rosa hut, 3,597 m, where you spend the night.

Day 2

From the hut you climb up first glacier, then steeper snow, and finally rock to gain the east ridge of the Spedela, a 4020 meter sub-peak of the Bernina. From here a narrow ridge crest sometimes rock, sometimes snow, leads to the airy summit. Follow the same route back to the hut to spend a second night.

 

Day 3

On our last day, traverse back across the Bellavista Terraces to the pass at the west end of the three summits of Piz Palü. The first summit is mostly rock. the second and third are snow, with some steep and narrow snow ridges to add spice to the adventure. After descending the large Vedret Pers glacier, climb back to the Diavolezza lift and take it back to the valley.

The descent is steep and can be dangerous. Temperatures in the region can hit -22 degrees celsius at night (uh brrr?) and the cache page says the initial ascent of the mountain is 5-6 hours — the descent about 4 hours. Geocachers are drawn to parts of the Earth like this to fight nerves and be in an environment where they feel at home. Spending three days to earn a geocache through blistering freezing temperatures, putting your faith into your pickaxe on the side of a cliff hundreds of meters in the air, and getting swept in all directions by the Apline wind is home to some. Call it crazy, call it geocaching, call it what you will, it’s all in the spirit of adventure and finding your happy place in the world.

 

“At 4:40 we started from the Diavolezza. Apart from the ascent on the previous day, the first day on the route was exhausting, even without the acclimation. But in the end, we had a good time on the saddle and could fill up the summit with a short break. We were able to get here without a rope, so it was no problem to quickly go to the memorial plaque. I was surprised at how wide the saddle is.

Thanks so much for the cache at this special place! This was, of course, the icing on the cake! Now I’m curious when I’ll find an even higher cache. For a while, this cache will probably remain on place 1 of my high altitude list.” –SteinbamOne 6th log entry.

The Schnuppels was the pioneer who placed this extreme cache, and only 8 others have braved the journey since 2014.

6 steps to organize a Cache In Trash Out® (CITO) event

Save the Earth while geocaching? Yes please! We call it CITO (Cache In Trash Out®).

In 2017, geocachers around the globe will gather together during the weeks of April 22-30 and September 23– October 1 to pick up trash, remove invasive species, repair trails and more—plus earn a pretty sweet new souvenir. If you’ve never hosted a CITO before and you don’t know where to begin, read on! Here are 6 steps to get you started.

cito

1. Choose a location and a date

Since your CITO event will result in an improvement to a public space, pick an area that’s important to you and/or that needs special attention. Make sure you have permission to host the CITO from the local land manager. If you are unsure about which location is best, call a local park manager or geocaching organization. They can provide assistance and support in selecting the best location.

947e18cc-972f-4139-b4ee-5aa1f7acf06e

2. Pick an activity

At it’s very basic, a CITO event should involve geocachers taking part in an activity that produces an environmental improvement to a park or another cache-friendly place. CITO activities have ranged from trash pickups, to tree plantings, to invasive species removals, to trail maintenance. Need inspiration and direction? Talk to the land manager to find out where volunteers are most needed. See if there are any local environmental organizations already doing volunteer work, with whom you can partner. Call your city’s Parks and Recreation department to find out if any city volunteer initiatives are planned.

kayak-cito

3. Fill out the cache submission form

Your CITO event will need to be submitted online at least two weeks before the date of the event. Give yourself a bit more time than that to square away any details.

  • Type & Location: Select Cache In, Trash Out as the event type, and enter the coordinates where your event will take place.
  • Waypoints (Optional): Is there parking near your event? A trailhead you need to find to get to the right spot? Let folks know.
  • Description & Summary: Where is the event, what time does it start and end, and what will folks be doing? Is any special type of clothing or gear required? Will there be activities suitable for young children, or do you have to be a spring chicken to partake? Will there be a lunch break? Any safety concerns? The more details you can supply, the better.

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4. Wait for the event to be published.

Once you’ve reviewed and submitted your event listing, your local Reviewer will likely publish the event or request changes to it within a week. If you don’t hear from your Reviewer, check to make sure the event listing is actually submitted and enabled. Check to see if the Reviewer has posted any Reviewer notes in the cache logs section. Once you’ve made any necessary changes, review and submit the listing once more. Feel free to ask your Reviewer for advice if you’re struggling with the event listing.

5. Once the event is published, let people know about it!

Is there a local geocaching organization you can reach out to, to let them know about your CITO? Maybe there are even some non-geocacher volunteer organizations you could recruit…the more the merrier!

Zug5

 6. On the day of the event…

  • Show up early.
  • Watch the cache page and your e-mail for last minute questions.
  • See to it that every person knows what the activity is, and how to do it.
  • Agree on a time and location to meet up and debrief at the close of the event.
  • After the event is over, keep the event listed long enough to allow people to log the event. Then write a thank you note, and archive it. Voila!

That’s all, folks! Remember: the CITO 2017 souvenir will be available for events during the weeks of April 22-30 and September 23-October 1, so if you’re planning to host an event that weekend make sure you submit the cache listing at least two weeks in advance, preferably more.

Processed with VSCO with g3 preset

Stay strong, geocachers
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Deep Darkness — Geocache of the Week

Traditional
GC1QC0V
by Balla & Silly
Difficulty:
2
Terrain:
3
Location:
Islas Baleares, Spain
N 39° 28.425 E 002° 29.127
Mediterranean sea side
Mediterranean sea side
Gorgeous views
Gorgeous views

This geocache is located in Islas Baleares, Spain in the western Mediterranean Sea near the eastern coast of the Iberian Peninsula. This idyllic area has everything you could ever dream of: beaches, prehistoric ruins, gorgeous countryside, and of course, awesome geocaching.

Awesome geocaching
Awesome geocaching

This geocache is in a former military zone which is now used by the public as a recreational area. It’s not suitable for little kids, people with claustrophobia, or people with nyctophobia (fear of the dark), but if you’re up for a hair raising adventure next to a beautiful ocean view (and who isn’t besides children, or people with claustrophobia, or people with nyctophobia), then this is your cache.

Former military zone
Former military zone
Are we sure we want to do this?
Are we sure we want to do this?
Got claustrophobia?
Got claustrophobia?

Normally for Geocache of the Week, we highlight several logs written by geocachers to give robust first-hand accounts of what it’s like to actually be there. This cache offered many amazing logs, but one in particular had to be shared in its entirety. And now ladies and gentlemen, without further ado, we present to you a log by Jessex:

We were looking forward to this cache. After hiking to the GZ, and looking down the shift, Mrs J says, “I’m staying up here.” Mr J got down to the first platform and started down the next ladder. With scenes from various catacomb films flashing in my head, I stopped. I swear I heard something evil in the darkness and I climbed as fast as I could back to daylight. Mrs J was kind but I was disappointed in myself, I knew I had get this cache.

Down I went, ignoring the images of zombies, murderers and maniacs in my head. With my light in my pack, I descended into the darkness, the worst part when my body was in the tunnel but my head still in the shaft. As soon as I could I looked both ways down the tunnel, hoping to alleviate my fears of impending death but, alas, I could see nothing but darkness. With feet finally on the ground and light on, I could now see there was no danger, at least for as far as my light shone, 20 feet or so. Trying to remember the way from the cache page, with my back to the ladder and went right.

There was a door to the left very close by, I thought how wonderful. Entering the room it grew in size as the light revealed it, I knew this was not the right place. The only option was a small door with the words “dead end” written above it, emphasising the DEAD. This tunnel was hacked from the rocks and led downward. I thought to myself, “There’s no way in hell am I going down there!” if I had no scruples, I would have high tailed it out of there and logged a find, but damn my morals, I walked into the abyss.

Next I did something I knew I shouldn’t, I looked behind me. There was nothing there, of course, but now I was even more aware of the enveloping darkness and dread. At the T junction I went left as instructed but moved a bit too fast to see the cache, I had to go back and search more slowly. Eureka, I found it. But how to hold the light, cache and find a pen and open the cache without losing control. I managed but just barely. I took a TB, closed up the cache and redid it, without any monsters getting me.

I noticed a light further down the tunnel, I thought I may have an easier way out. Managing to squeeze by the boulder blocking the exit and climb a little only to see I was deeper than I thought. I could not risk climbing the cliffs back to Mrs J, on fear of plummeting to my death. Dread overtook me as I realised I must leave the glorious sunshine and descend once again into the realm of the dead.

Stiff-lipped, I slid into the tunnel and began walking into the darkness. My light was fading and I was sure I saw a being walking toward me, I sped up hoping to get to the turn before it did. I turned right and headed up the incline of jutting rocks, hearing something behind me, I refused to look, focusing on the tunnel ahead. At the door I closed it as far as I could, concentrated on getting to the ladder. Looking right, I saw the big room again, only this time a sinister feeling overtook me. I heard the door I had just shut begin to open. Don’t look, don’t look. Just get to the exit. I put the light into my pack, walking the last few steps in only the light offered by the ladder shaft. Up the ladder, up the ladder.

I am not fit, and am carrying extra weight, but fear and adrenalin are great helpers. Up to the platform, listening to heavy breathing, was it mine or the monster’s? Legs don’t fail me now! The last few rungs almost got me but finally I was bathed in light and arms of Mrs J. We did it, mission accomplished!

Favourite point, thanks.
Jessex (UK)

Stay strong, geocachers
Stay strong, geocachers
You'll be fine
You’ll be fine
Just a little further
Just a little further
Which tunnel is the correct one?
Which tunnel is the correct one?
Is that a dead end?
Is that a dead end?
Jose was here
Jose was here
Is this the cache?
Is this the cache?
Light at the end of the tunnel
Light at the end of the tunnel
And a little turtle friend to comfort you on a job well done
And a little turtle friend to comfort you on a job well done

Continue to explore some of the most amazing geocaches around the world.
Check out all of the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog. If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, fill out this form.