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“Captain Jacques Yves Cousteau” GCJ9YK GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – 7/26/2010

The Virtual Cache titled, “Captain Jacques Yves Cousteau” (GCJ9YK) takes divers forty feet below the surface of the Pacific Ocean.  At this location you’ll discover a plaque honoring Caption Jacques Yves Cousteau.

This difficulty 4, terrain 5 Virtual Cache delivers geocachers to what’s reported to be one of the most popular dive sites on the West Coast of North America.  The dive site is located off Catalina Island, California.  According to the cache page, you must use SCUBA gear to reach the cache and dive with a partner.

PezCachers, Jill and Ken, created the geocache.

They say, “We enjoy placing caches that have some sort of history to them and are fun to find. GCJ9YK is a fine example of that. When we placed the cache in 2004, there were very few underwater caches and we thought it would be fun to see how many geocachers were divers. Turns out there are a lot! Thanks for bringing attention to the great legend who gave us a vision and the key to the silent world.”

PezCachers asks three questions before you’re able to claim the cache. Beside answering to those questions at this Virtual Cache, you’ll also discover much more: wrecks, drop-offs and come face to face with countless colorful fish.

Explore all the Geocaches of the Week here.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Virtual Caches are no longer available for creation on Geocaching.com.  These types of caches are now considered waymarks on Waymarking.com.

Groundspeak Weekly Newsletter 7/16/2010

Five Important Things to Know Before Placing a Geocache

There are now more than 1.1 million active geocaches around the world. The most exciting geocaching experiences come from fun, creative and challenging geocaches. If you would like to add your own cache to the growing tally, here are five important things to consider before you get started.

1. The more experience you have finding caches, the better you will be at knowing what makes a great hide. So, get out there and find a bunch of caches before you consider hiding your own.

2. Review the guidelines for placing a geocache. They are fundamental to ensuring that your cache can be listed on Geocaching.com.

3. Geocaches cannot be placed within 1/10th of a mile (161 m) of one another. Visit www.geocaching.com/seek and conduct a search for caches in the area that you have chosen for your cache. If the area is saturated with geocaches, you may want to consider a more unique location.

4. A volunteer reviewer looks at each new geocache listing before it is published on Geocaching.com. Work with your local reviewer. They are highly experienced geocachers and may have follow-up questions or advice that will help expedite the review process.

5. Owning a geocache requires an ongoing commitment. Maintenance requirements include upkeep of the container, replacing the logbook and addressing any unforeseen problems. If you want to place a geocache, make sure that the area is accessible to you so that you can fulfill this obligation.

Find more information about placing a geocache in the Groundspeak Knowledge Books.

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Travel Bug Rescue – Learn from a Pro

Scott Stracener, Me2Ugly, rescuing a Travel Bug.

Scott Stracener is geocacher Me2Ugly.  You may recognize his name if you’ve ever had a Travel Bug in need of rescue.  He’s currently ranked among the best of the best in Travel Bug rescue. Scott talked to us about how you can request assistance in rescuing your wayward Travel Bug or become a rescuer yourself.

Latitude 47: How did you hear about Travel Bug rescue?

Scott: I found out about TB Rescue through Geocaching.com.  I was just clicking around the site and saw a banner ad.  I clicked on the banner to get more information.  I thought that it was a great idea and a great way to get more involved with geocaching.  I know I would like someone to grab my Travel Bug or coin and move it along.  This gives us a way to help fellow cachers and to connect with others on a more personal note.

The long road to rescue. Me2Ugly treks up a California road to rescue a Travel Bug.

Latitude 47: What is your most gratifying recovery?

Scott: Most gratifying rescue, there are two.  Obviously, my first successful rescue.  TB2ECQA ‘Geocoin Club June 2008’.  The coin was dropped on 11/4/2009. The owner requested a rescue on 3/12/2010, 128 days after the drop.  I saw the request on 3/15 and went out the next morning, hiked up Sugarloaf Mountain to retrieve the coin.  I then took it to the ‘Un-Original Stash’ in Oregon, which is where my most memorable TB Rescue took place.

TB346VW ‘KC The Traveling Gorilla’, created by a mother for her son to watch the Travel Bug move from cache to cache.  KC was dropped on 1/31/10 and the mother requested a rescue on 4/21/10.  My investigation of the TB showed that it had only been active for two months and was already stuck.  I was going to be in the neighborhood (Un-Original Stash) so I [thought, “I] will stop by the last known cache for the Travel Bug.”  On 4/25/10, I found the cache and rescued the Travel Bug.  I had already decided that if I found the Travel Bug I would take it to the Project A.P.E. cache Mission 9: Tunnel of Light.  For the next month I kept KC The Traveling Gorilla and took him on a number of cache hunts, a Cache Rescue (which I do when requested through WSGA) and even a TB-Rescue on the Olympic Peninsula that was unsuccessful.  On 5/24/10, I dropped KC The Traveling Gorilla at Mission 9.  Then, when finishing the Geo TRIAD at HQ, I spotted KC there.  That was cool.

Latitude 47: What advice do you have if someone is interested in Travel Bug rescue?

Scott: Know the area where the rescue will take place.  No Travel Bug Rescue is worth risking yourself or property.  Have fun and remember that not all rescues can be successful.  However, when they are, it really feels great.

Latitude 47: Have you ever lost a Travel Bug?

Scott: I have not lost a Travel Bug.  I do not have that many out there.  I do know I will launch one on July 17th near Fort Casey on Whidbey Island, WA.  It will be my grandson’s second birthday.

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Geocaching Caption Contest 8 – Win an Actual Coveted Prize

Winning Caption: “Trackable sounds an awful lot like snackable – close enough for me!” – Moozer

This is the eighth installment of our Geocaching Caption Contest.  Travel Bugs are one of the joys of the geocaching experience.  This Travel Bug may have ended up in a precarious predicament. What caption would you write for this photo?  “Travel Bug destination? My belly?”

You can do better.  The winner receives an actual Coveted Prize.

Coveted Prize

The prize for this contest is a trackable 10 years coin. Good luck!  Please include your geocaching username in all entries.

The winner will be chosen by an ad hoc committee of Lackeys.

13 Lackeys voted to crown the winner of the seventh Geocaching Caption Contest.  Take a look at the post to see who won.  Explore the wit and wisdom of geocachers by checking out all the Geocaching Caption Contests.

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Groundspeak’s Lost & Found Celebration – Geocaching.com’s Lost & Found Video

Geocachers from around the world celebrated ten years of geocaching at Groundspeak Headquarters in Seattle, Washington on July 4th, 2010.  The Lost & Found Celebration brought together thousands of geocachers, dozens of Lackeys, Groundspeak’s mascot Signal the Frog, the Bubbleman, a dunk tank and The Founders of Geocaching.com.

Geocachers were also able to explore the Fremont neighborhood and earn a trackable HQ tag by completing a scavenger hunt.

Groundspeak CEO, President and Co-Founder Jeremy Irish gets dunked.

There’s more celebrating to come. Stay tuned for additional plans to commemorate ten years of geocaching.

Tell us, how have you celebrated a decade of geocaching?

You can see even more geocaching adventures by watching our Lost & Found video series here.