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New: Official Posters For Your CITO Event

CITO Week begins this Saturday!

For the first time in geocaching history, there will be global CITO Week from September 17–25, 2016. Visit the CITO calendar to find an event near you.

Are you hosting or helping out at one of these events? If so, these CITO materials are for you! You can use these posters to help promote your CITO Events during CITO Week and all year long.

Posters To print and Post At Your CITO:

SignalandCITO

Download a printable version here.

CITOPoster

Download a printable version here. 

Add THIS Official CITO Banner To YOur Event Page:

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Check out these instructions for adding an image to your geocache description.

What do you have planned for your CITO Event? Tell us in the comments below.

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Last Call For Fall CITO Events 2016!

Cache In Trash Out® Week is almost here! CITO Events are a chance for geocachers to give back to their local spaces and communities, and may involve tree planting, litter pick up, or even habitat restoration. From September 17–25, you can even earn a special souvenir by attending one.

It’s not too late to submit a CITO of your own. Check out this blog post for tips on hosting your own CITO. But remember: CITO Events must be submitted at least two weeks prior to the event date.

Ready to get your hands dirty? Check out CITO gear from Shop Geocaching.

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Advantages (and Disadvantages) of Being A Geo-Teen

Guest blog written by Mark Webb, aka Troopbiz

Geocaching in September, 2015
Troopbiz Geocaching in September, 2015

                                                                                                                                       
Introduction

My name is Mark Webb. I’m fourteen years old, live in West Virginia, USA, geocache as Troopbiz, and have over 1,800 finds. I love geocaching because I get to explore new places around my hometown that I’ve never been to and it allows me to get outside and explore nature. 

 

Getting Into Geocaching                                                                                                     

The early days of geocaching
The early days of geocaching

I first started geocaching on July 1, 2009 at the age of 8. My Mom came across a link to Geocaching.com while looking at the local parks and recreation site, and it snowballed from there.  I found my first geocache, Black and Gold (GCRET0) two days later. I was hooked. What started out as a family activity to get outside and explore new areas, turned into a new loved obsession. Within that first year, I found over 100 and was eager to find 100 more. Three years later, I found my 1,000th geocache, Gadgets at Deckers Creek. (GC1M90Y).

1000

 

 

 

 

Shortly thereafter, I joined the Boy Scouts and quickly earned the Geocaching merit badge. I have educated many Boy Scout troops as well as a 4-H club in my community about geocaching by going caching with them around a local park.

 

 

 

Quality Over Quantity

Troopbiz's geocache, Brick By Brick (GC5JB1H), is built completely out of LEGOs!
Geocachers find Troopbiz’s cache, Brick By Brick (GC5JB1H), built completely out of LEGOs!

Although it can be fun to get wrapped up in the numbers, what really matters in the find behind the numbers. What makes geocaching fun is when someone puts a lot of thought and planning into a geocache.


Therefore, I like to do the same with my hides. My first geocache, Up, Down, & Up Again! (GC29NWE) currently has 242 finds and 51 favorite points. I hid a cache called Brick By Brick (GC5JB1H) made completely out of LEGOs. I also have a Puzzle Cache called Cars Cache (GC5AK6Y) based off the movie Cars. I enjoy Puzzle Caches the most because they offer an initial thrill of solving the puzzle, then another after you find the cache. I have also made friends with several other creative geocache hiders in my area such as arealwhit and killlerbee, and we go caching together on a regular basis.

 

 

 

It’s Not Always Easy Being Young

Being a young geocacher does have its advantages, like thinking differently when looking for a cache or climbing a hill with ease. But there are several disadvantages. The hardest thing about being a young geocacher is not having my driver’s license yet. My family and friends assist me on most of my caching adventures. It takes a lot of planning (and convincing), but they usually let me grab “just one more” cache.

CITOs, T5 tree cache,
Hosting CITOs, earning T5s, cachin’, and getting the FTF – all in a day’s work for Mark


It is also very difficult to complete challenges like the
Fizzy Grid or the 365/Every Day Challenge with family members who don’t have the same drive as me.  Another disadvantage of being a young geocacher is not understanding older references. Many Puzzle Caches in my area revolve around older movies, tv shows, and songs. Although I don’t always understand what references a geocache is making, Google usually does!

 

The Future of Geocaching

Troopbiz Grotto falls
What adventures await us in 2016?


I’m excited to see what the future of geocaching has in store for 2016. One huge accomplishment I would like to achieve is making my 2,000th find. I would also like to continue working on my Fizzy and Every Day grids. Although I don’t think I will complete them any time soon, every block filled is another step closer.

I’m also looking forward to events in 2016, such as attending my 5th Midwest Geobash. In general, I would like to see more teens get into geocaching as it is a good way to get away from reality and explore new areas in your hometown. I can’t wait to see what the new year holds and what geocaching adventures await!

 

 

 

 

We love meeting members of the geocaching community that inspire us. Have you ever geocached with someone from a different generation, and learned a thing or two? If you’re a younger geocacher, what tricks of the trade have you learned from more “mature” geocachers? Tell us in the comments below!

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Geocachers Cleanup Awards for Cleaning Up

Award-winning group of geocachers

The environment wins big when geocachers attend Cache In Trash Out (CITO) events. But now a group of Texas, USA geocachers are winning for their cleanup efforts.

Travis Gilbert (SKnight579) organized the Permian Basin Cachers Association CITO Events. Travis says, “We are a smaller group of cachers (around about 30) in the middle of nowhere out in West Texas.”

“A smaller group” with a big agenda to pick up trash. They’ve adopted two sites and pledged to clear trash from those areas on a regular basis. One site is a stretch of four lane highway and another is a location in a nearby city.  The group has held CITO events at these locations over the past couple years. Travis says, “We are under contract to clean the road two times a year, we do it four times a year, and we also separate out recyclables as we go for a small bit of money for the group (covers the water basically).”

Permian Basin Geocachers Win State Award

Travis says the extra effort was noticed. His email inbox had a surprise waiting for him a couple weeks ago, “I received an email from the State of Texas that our little group would also be getting the “Group of the Year” award for the State! I’m really proud of our group.” Gilbert says they also won another award from the City of Midland, Texas for the Permian Basin Geocachers cleanup efforts there.

He says the group is inspiring other local geocachers to help make a difference. “I know of several other groups of cachers in Texas that have adopted roads and spots after seeing what our group has done and I could not be prouder of our group.”

Trackable state and local awards for Permian Geocachers

Bagging trash and picking up recyclables has an occasional reward.

Travis says, “The best find was our last cleanup in April when we found 20 proof sets of coins scattered over half of our adopted area. We called the police and no one had reported them missing and I spoke about it on the news that night and no one tried to contact me, so win win. There were 10 of us cleaning that trip so we raffled them and each took two sets home.”

Now they’re also taking home trophies. Travis did what any geocacher would do with the awards. He says “I’ve also made both awards Trackable.” Check out the Trackable pages here and here. Three geocachers, besides Travis, attended all the CITO events. They include grumpyoldtexan, DeKoning, and ZSandmann.

Since 2002, geocachers around the world have been dedicated to improving parks and other cache-friendly places. There are dozens of CITO events around the world each month. Check out the CITO Events Calendar to find at CITO near you.

Permian Basin Geocachers