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“Desert Geocaching” A Geocaching.com Lost & Found Video

One-third of all land on the planet is considered desert. The parched earth is not off-limits to the ingenuity of geocachers.  Watch the Geocaching.com Lost & Found video “Desert Geocaching.” See your fellow geocachers use the sand and shrubs as a sprawling canvas to create and enjoy the GPS-enabled treasure hunt.

Desert geocaching in California

Geocachers say the wide expanses offer those hiding geocaches nearly unlimited creativity and those finding geocaches unlimited fun.

You can explore more videos on the adventure of geocaching.  Check out  the Geocaching.com Lost & Found video gallery.  Explore 4×4 geocaching, watch a Travel Bug go around the world and visit the highest and lowest geocaches in existence.

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“4 Jan” GC1T8R0 GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – November 15, 2010

"4 Jan" (GC1T8R0)

The regular sized geocache “4 Jan” (GC1T8R0) hides in Holyrood Park in Edinburgh, Scotland.  But the geocache isn’t “for” someone named Jan.  It has a different meaning altogether.

Cache owner C3P4J created “4 Jan” as his first hide. He writes in the cache description that the name of the cache is the anniversary date of his wedding. He and his fiance were married on January 4th.

Geocachers discover more than a sentimental geocache.  They are treated to amazing views of Edinburgh and the Firth of Forth.

The size of this cache makes it easy to trade items, sign the log book or even drop a Travel Bug.

Depending on the route that you take, the three star terrain trek may require a bit of steep climbing.  The payoffs also include an unforgettable visit to the ruins of St. Anthony’s Chapel (pictured above and below).

The cache has been found more than 150 times since to was placed in June of 2009.

Continue your exploration with some of the most engaging geocaches from around the world. Explore all the Geocaches of the Week on our blog or view the Bookmark List on Geocaching.com.

"4 Jan" in summer
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Super-Sized Geocoin Touted as World’s Largest

Geocacher Louis Cifer with the world's largest geocoin

If your pockets jingle with Geocoins, your Saturday night is spent cleaning and collating your immaculate Geocoin collection or you just want to be wowed by a wonder of the geocaching world – take a look to your left.

What you behold is touted as the world’s largest Geocoin. Geocacher Louis Cifer and a team of others created the handcrafted 40 kilogram (88 lb), 97 cm (38 inch) Geocoin.

Average size geocoins

Geocoins are traditionally no larger than an U.S. silver dollar or a 1 Euro coin (see the photo to your right).

A Geocoin is a special trackable coin created by  geocachers as a kind of signature item or calling card. The shape of coins varies from round to square even interconnected hoops or unique forms like miniature swords.

According to Louis, the hefty anchor Geocoin was created to be an unforgettable gift. He says  a group of friends hoped that it would show their appreciation to the host of a geocaching event.

Geocacher AlexSchweigert organizes “Nordseetaufe 2010” (North Sea Baptism 2010).  The official event Geocoin for “Nordseetaufe” was a much smaller anchor.

Original event geocoin for Nordseetaufe 2010

Louis and friends took the event coin theme and super-sized it.  A 80-year-old anchor was purchased, sand blasted and painted gold.

They then welded a plate commemorating Nordseetaufe 2010 to the anchor and added the unique tracking code.

AlexSchweigert was presented with the massive Geocoin, named “Der Dicke” (The Big or The Heavy) on October 23rd.

Louis says, “It was a huge surprise for AlexSchweigert and he was very impressed.”

Louis says the Geocoin, which weighs about as much as the average 12-year-old boy,  even had a Twitter account. Geocachers Tweeted mysterious updates about the coin before it was unveiled. “Der Dicke” is listed as the “world’s largest geocoin” on the German language geocoin Wikipedia page.

Geocachers in Germany have been discovering “Der Dicke” at events since mid-October.  But now the Geocoin has a permanent location in the hometown of its owner, AlexSchweigert.   If you see “Der Dicke” in person, you can log the Geocoin as “discovered.”

To do that, you’ll have to travel to the anchor’s new location outside of Hamburg, Germany. “Der Dicke” should be easy to find; right now it’s located at a geocache, also called, “Der Dicke.”

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Groundspeak Weekly Newsletter – November 10, 2010

Geocaching for Windows Phone 7

Discover Groundspeak’s official Geocaching Application for the new Windows Phone 7 Operating System. Windows Phone 7 devices are now available in North America and many European and Asian countries. The Geocaching for Windows Phone 7 Application is available in English, with plans to support multiple languages in the near future.

Features include:

• Instant, direct access to Geocaching.com’s database of worldwide geocaches

• Search by current location, address or GC code

• Access geocache details, including description, photo gallery, attributes, recent logs, hint and inventory

• Log geocache finds and post notes in the field

• Download active Pocket Queries (Premium Member feature)

• Filter geocaches that you and 4 of your closest geocaching partners have already found (Premium Member feature)

View screenshots and check out more application features here.

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“Accessible Geocaching” A Geocaching.com Lost & Found Video

Kevin Berg, kberg31974, will tell you he’s not the best person to gauge the accessibility of geocaches.  Kevin says he often takes his wheelchair where it was never designed to go.  The computer consultant has spent most of his life confined to a wheelchair due to the neurological condition  Cerebral Palsy.  The disorder doesn’t define Kevin.  He’s a father, college graduate, entrepreneur and geocacher.

Geocacher Kevin Berg (kberg31974)

Watch “Accessible Geocaching,” a Geocaching.com Lost & Found video, to experience the joy of inclusive geocaching. Kevin, his wife and other mobility impaired geocachers search for geocaches with a terrain rating of one on a five-star scale.

Hear why those who place the one star difficulty caches believe that these geocaches serve the whole geocaching community.

You can explore more videos on the adventure of geocaching.  Check out  the Geocaching.com Lost & Found video gallery.  Explore new Geocaching.com souvenirs, meet a family who says geocaching helps their autistic son and visit the highest and lowest geocaches in existence.