The Geocaching Blog


Catch a cacher by the toe. – “EANEY-MEANY-MINEY-MOE” (GC3Q51P) – Geocache of the Week

Closer up.

A close up view of this tricky geocache.

Geocache Name:

“EANEY-MEANY-MINEY-MOE” (GC3Q51P)

 

Difficulty/Terrain Rating:

2.5/1.5

Why this is the Geocache of the Week:

Some geocaches make you work for the find by being in a difficult-to-reach location, others make you solve a difficult puzzle before you can figure out the final coordinates. In the case of this geocache, the hard work comes once you get to the geocache’s location. Known as a field-puzzle (a puzzle solved—guess where—in the field), these geocaches require a certain level of patience, skill and maybe even a few TOTTs (tools of the trade). Geocachers at this puzzle have to use sticks to move a container to the top of the tube, but only one tube has the actual container. The best way to choose your tube? Eaney, meany, miney, moe.

 

What geocachers are saying:

“This is BY FAR, my favorite cache EVER!!!! Super fun, and quite inventive. Thx so very much for the cache, and the good time solving it!” – Caching Bayou Self

“Super Cool Cache!!! One of the best I’ve seen anywhere! I really wish there were more like this!! T4TC. Thanks so much for the Goodies as well.” – ISPI

“Awesome! Awesome! Awesome! Awesome! Truly a test of the fine motor skills and eye-hand coordination if ever there was one.” – Ian’s Dad

 

What the Geocache owner, mitrustme, has to say:

“You have to work a matchstick container to the top of the pipe that has holes drilled into it with two nails and hope it has the log to sign and it not you have to start on the next pipe and so on till you get the right one.

We had a cacher friend give us a single pipe and decided to make it a little harder, so we put four pipes on a pole and named it EANEY-MEANY-MENEY-MOE and put it in our front yard so we could watch everyone find it and bring them water on hot days and cocoa on cold days. We were very pleased everyone likes it and have made a lot of new friends.

I just wanted to let everyone know this was my husband Ricky and my idea, he did the labor and put it up.  My husband was diagnosed with leukemia in Sept. 2011 and after 4 months of treatment he was in remission for nine months.  And I would like to thank all of our caching friends for make those nine months great.  He enjoyed all the caching trips we all went on and the events everyone put on.  Ricky passed on Nov. 17, 2012, 10 days after we found out his leukemia was back and I would like to thank all of our friends for their support.  Ricky loved caching!”

 

Photos:

 

This geocache requires hard work and a lot of patience.

This geocache requires hard work and a lot of patience.

Two geocachers working to figure this one out.

Two geocachers working to figure this one out.

Which one will you pick?

Which one will you pick?

What has been the trickiest field puzzle geocache you’ve ever found? Tell us and post photos in the comments.

Continue to explore some of the most engaging geocaches around the globe. Check out all the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog. If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, just fill out this form. Thanks!

5 Tips for Writing the Best Log in the World

Some logs posted on Geocaching.com offer only a snapshot into the geocaching adventure, but great logs produce a panoramic view of the geocaching quest. Great logs inform other geocachers of what they might expect on their ‘caching adventure. They also reward geocache owners, who enjoy reading about the experiences of those seeking their ‘caches.

forest2

Share your experience beyond a TFTC (Thanks for the Cache) or TNLN (Took Nothing Left Nothing) log by following these 5 tips:

 

1) See it and Say it – Describe what you saw and experienced on your way to the geocache. Did you see a rare bird, a hidden waterfall, or Harrison Ford? Tell folks about it.

2) Be a Superhero – If there are new conditions in the area, like a fallen tree or heavy snow, warn other geocachers. You’d want them to do the same for you.

3) Talk about Trades – Tell people what is in the geocache container along with what you took and what you left.

4) Shout Out for the Cache Owner – Thank the cache owner for placing the geocache. TFTC is a perfectly acceptable way to do it, but feel free to be a little more creative with it.

5) Learn from Others – Think about the best log you’ve ever read…what made it so special? Humor? Sincerity? A haiku?

Geocache owners can reward those who write great logs by sending them a thank you email through their Geocaching.com profile. Have you thanked a good logger recently?

Before GPS and Geocaching Existed: Three Navigation Systems

 

iteravto2

Inter-Auto or “Iter-Avto”

Nowadays, we’re lucky to have an abundance of smartphones and GPS devices to help us navigate to different locations (and to our beloved geocaches). But did you know that personal navigation predates the invention of Global Positioning Systems (GPS)? Prior to Sputnik, TRANSIT, and GPS devices, there were three personal navigation maps that we still see glimpses of in today’s modern technology. Get ready to learn!

 

Cane Maps

It started at the 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago… In celebration with the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’s entry into the New World, the Columbian Novelty Company created “Cane Maps”. The cane map was a 10″ x 16″ sheet with maps printed on both sides. It rolled in and out of a wooden cane. The front side contained a map of the fairgrounds and the back side of the map was of Chicago, showing popular tourist attractions in the area. These maps were sold in gift shops at the fair and paved the way for future mapping and navigation techniques.

First Cane Map in 1893

First Cane Map in 1893

           

 

Plus Fours RouteFinder

Watch-you-wearing? Worn around the wrist, the Plus Fours Routefinder was a fashionable and efficient way to transit. These watch-like devices contained miniature scrolls with driving directions that rotated and updated as the motorist moved. The scrolls could be switched out and changed depending on what route was taken. 

Plus Fours RouteFinder

Plus Fours RouteFinder

Inter-Auto or “Iter-Avto”

Zoom Zoom! In 1932, an Italian company releases the Inter-Auto, the world’s first personal navigation system for an automobile. This device also contained a scrolling map and additionally, connected to the car’s speedometer to maintain an accurate scrolling rate. Similar to a modern day Garmin or Tom Tom, this device showed a motorist’s position in real-time.

Iteravto

Inter-Auto or “Iter-Avto”

 

 

Navigation systems today have come a long way since Cane Maps and Inter-Autos. With the addition of the GPS, geocachers today have numerous devices to choose from. As technology advances, it will be fascinating to see the direction navigation systems will head in the coming years.

 

What is your preferred device for geocaching?

Not done reading yet? Check the ghosts lingering in your GPS in this Who’s Hiding in Your GPS Device? post from 2010.

 

Sources and Images: Before There was GPS: Personal Navigation in the 1920s and 1930s, Cane MapsThe antique route show: ‘First ever built-in sat nav’ from 1930 which used a map on a scroll to guide motorists

It was a Dark and Stormy Night… for Reading about Geocaching

Geobook

Special thanks to Julie Henning (CalORie) for the perfect lead in image for this post.

We here at Geocaching HQ love to hang out with each other during work, while throwing a few back at a local happy hour, and of course while geocaching together on the weekends. So when one of our lackeys suggested starting a book club, we got pretty excited and wondered about geocaching-themed books that may be out in the world. Turns out that there’s a LOT. There’s even a thread in our forums about it. Here are some of our top picks for geocaching books out in the world:

Caching In: A Geocaching Love Story by Tracy Krimmer

“Can a compass lead you to love?”

Ahh, romance and Tupperware in the woods. In Tracy Krimmer’s Caching In: A Geocaching Love Story, we meet broken-hearted Ally Couper who’s, “…had enough with her ridiculous life. Her job at the bank is going nowhere, and her love life might as well be non-existent. Determined to try something new, Ally becomes absorbed in the world of geocaching. The high-tech driven scavenger hunt introduces her to Seth, and she realizes the game isn’t the only thrilling part. Ally’s bad luck may finally be changing, until the past threatens to halt her future with Seth. Can they find happiness together, or is love the one cache Ally can’t find?” I hope this doesn’t have any DNFs!

Romance & caching seem to go hand in hand, but apparently not as much as mysteries & ammo cans. Check out these “whodunits”:

Cache a Predator is a geocaching thriller about a father’s love, justice, and the unhinged game of hide-the-cache .

“Cache a Predator is a geocaching thriller about a father’s love, justice, and the unhinged game of hide-the-cache.”

Cache a Predator: A Geocaching Mystery by Michelle Weidenbenner is a Gold Medal Winner in the 2014 Readers’ International Awards and gets high review marks from online book seller sites. “M. Weidenbenner plants the emotion of one vigilante’s mission into the cache boxes of a gripping tale that will leave readers locking their doors…” Plus, someone is planting body parts in geocaching sites. I wouldn’t want to be FTF that geocache!

"While looking for a cache in the mountains he comes across a human skeleton..."

“While looking for a cache in the mountains he comes across a human skeleton…”

The synopsis of Cached Out: A Cliff Knowles Mystery by Russell Atkinson already has me on the edge of my seat. “Newly retired from the FBI and alone after the tragic death of his wife, Cliff Knowles takes up geocaching. While looking for a cache in the mountains he comes across a human skeleton and reports it to the sheriff’s office. Then a second body is found – a fresh corpse this time – right after Cliff found another geocache nearby. When it turns out the first remains are those of a fugitive he was supposed to arrest years earlier, he becomes a suspect in a multiple homicide investigation. He has no choice but to use his sleuthing skills to identify the mysterious cache owner, known only as Enigmal, and free himself from suspicion.”

But what about the kids? Oh the little ones certainly have a lot to choose from, too:

“Congratulations!” the note says. “You’ve found it!”

As a kid I loved the Boxcar Children series and the adventures of Henry, Jessie, Violet, and Benny Alden. In The Box That Watch Found (The Boxcar Children Mysteries #113) by Gertrude Chandler Warner, their dog Watch discovers a mysterious box that turns out to be, you guessed it, a geocache! But just as the Alden kids start to embrace their new found hobby, they find that several geocaches in the area are disappearing. This book is a great way to introduce kids 7-10 to the world of geocaching or enhance their already established hobby.

"...Using his GPS, he uncovers the geocache-a small metal box-hidden deep in the woods..."

“…Using his GPS, he uncovers the geocache-a small metal box-hidden deep in the woods…”

Young teenagers might actually consider taking a break from texting and putting their smartphones GPS to use after reading Hide & Seek by Katy Grant. This 240 page chapter book follows 14-year-old Chase who, “…finally gets a chance to go on his first solo geocaching adventure. Using his GPS, he uncovers the geocache-a small metal box-hidden deep in the woods in some undergrowth. Inside, with a few plastic army men and a log book, is a troubling message for help in a child’s handwriting.” This one gets high points from both readers and educators in online reviews. 

Our Co-Founder Bryan and his family are on the cover of this good read.

Our Co-Founder Bryan and his family are on the cover of this good read.

Is this a good place to plug The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Geocaching: Third Edition by The Editors and Staff of Geocaching.com? No? Alrighty then, moving on… ;-)

A geocaching novel in a geocache! Geogirl by Kelly Rysten can be found on Kindle

Finally, you clever cachers really have thought of everything, haven’t you? Including a book club themed geocache! If you ever find yourself in Ridgecrest, California and need a new read, hop on over to Paperback Book Cache GC1ADKF. The Ridgecrest California Geocachers Club says that this 2d/2t geocache is and easy to find, and bring a book if you want to take a book. One log said, “I took two books, one by Gordon R. Dickson that I haven’t even heard of, and one in the Honor Harrington series by Weber. Left two of Rysten’s books, signed by the author. Enjoy!”

So how about you? Read any good (Geocaching) books lately? Tell us in the comments below!

Maybe it’s over there? — To Too Two Easy (GC1XA6W) — Geocache of the Week

Where oh where could it be? Photo by geocacher 3 Williams Kidz

Where oh where could it be? Photo by geocacher 3 Williams Kidz

Geocache Name:

To Too Two Easy (GC1XA6W)

 

Difficulty/Terrain Rating:

1/1.5

Why this is the Geocache of the Week:

What makes a great geocache? Does it have to have an amazing container? A beautiful location? An epic puzzle? As far as I’m concerned, the best geocaches are the ones that bring a smile to your face. Just like this one. A breath of fresh air for geocachers who might be a tad frustrated with a hard puzzle, this geocache is relatively easy to spot. Although, by looking at the photos, it would seem that some geocachers still tend to have troubles finding it.

 

What geocachers are saying:

“Funniest one yet!!” — hjay6906

“Yes!! after 3 DNF’s I finally made a score in Silverton. Way cool and tricky too. Hope the photo doesn’t give away too much and spoil the find.” – ADVTraveler

“Okay, this is my kind of cache. Going thru Colorado with far too many DNFs, this one brought a smile to my face. Thanks. SL, left two bits.” – cyclocat

 

What the Geocache owner, Jake92, has to say:

“Geocaching friends were visiting from Denver and they thought I had to many difficult caches and I should do a real easy one. This one was really too easy,  but they  liked it and convinced me to submit it for publishing. So far the cache has never been muggled.

I was amazed by the feed back I got from cachers  from the U.S. and  other countries. The description several of their visits very comical and good sense of humor  Some were going to use my idea, which is fine with me. Because of this cache I have met many cachers ,newbies and seasoned.

I would like to thank all who have visited to too two easy for the positive responses , the favorites and  hope all that visit this cache will leave with a smile.”

 

Photos:

Maybe it's up there. Photo by geocacher SprinklesB

Maybe it’s up there. Photo by geocacher SprinklesB

Chick-A-D struggling to find the cache. Maybe one day she'll find it.

Chick-A-D struggling to find the cache. Maybe one day she’ll find it.

Can you spot it? Photo by geocacher Eispiraten DD

Can you spot it? Photo by geocacher Eispiraten DD

 

What was the last geocache that made you smile? Tell us and post photos in the comments.

Continue to explore some of the most engaging geocaches around the globe. Check out all the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog. If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, just fill out this form. Thanks!


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