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“Kilimanjaro Lava Tower” GC25W5D GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – July 18th, 2010

Kilimanjaro Lava Tower (GC25W5D) is an EarthCache three million years in the making.  KDubs created this EarthCache and two others on the mountain.    Kilimanjaro Lava Tower (GC25W5D), Kilimanjaro Climate Zones (GC1X8Ao) and Kilimanjaro Glacial Sublimation (GC29PKY) all wait for visitors to answer their EartheCache questions.

Lava Tower


Kilimanjaro’s summit reaches 19,342 feet (5895 meters) into the clouds.  The Eastern African mountain rose about three million years ago during the formation of the Great Right Valley. Kilimanjaro Lava Tower (GC25W5D) requires you to answer two questions about this rock tower, from one of the three volcanoes which comprise the mountain.

Kilimanjaro Climate Zones (GC1X8A0) asks you to take a photo in each of the five climate zone on the mountain.

Kilimanjaro Glacial Sublimation (GC29PKY) challenges you to explore the fading glaciers of the mountain.  You need to answer three questions and provide a photo.

Geocachers at the summit of Kilimanjaro
Glacier on Kilimanjaro

Today, adventures hike up the mountain in the thousands.  Geocachers stop along the way to claim EarthCaches, learn about the mountain, the forces that formed it and the glaciers that still crown Kilimanjaro.

Explore other Geocaches of the Week here.

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GeoWoodstock VIII – Geocaching.com’s Lost & Found Video

Geocachers gathered in Carnation, WA, USA to celebrate GeoWoodstock VIII. The event on July 3rd, 2010 drew thousands.  Do wish you were there?  Did you attend and want to relive the experience?  Watch this video postcard from the world’s largest geocaching-related event.

Play the Lost & Found video above to witness the spectacle that inspired so many geocachers to travel so far.  See a giant geocache, witness Geocoin Poker and hear from geocachers from around the globe.

If you missed GeoWoodstock VIII, you haven’t missed all the fun.  Already, more than 700 geocachers have logged “will attends” for GeoWoodstock IX.  The geocaching nation will visit Warren, Pennsylvania for the event on July 2nd, 2011.

If you attended GeoWoodstock VIII, please share where you visited from and your favorite memory.

View all the Lost & Found stories here.

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“Captain Jacques Yves Cousteau” GCJ9YK GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – 7/26/2010

The Virtual Cache titled, “Captain Jacques Yves Cousteau” (GCJ9YK) takes divers forty feet below the surface of the Pacific Ocean.  At this location you’ll discover a plaque honoring Caption Jacques Yves Cousteau.

This difficulty 4, terrain 5 Virtual Cache delivers geocachers to what’s reported to be one of the most popular dive sites on the West Coast of North America.  The dive site is located off Catalina Island, California.  According to the cache page, you must use SCUBA gear to reach the cache and dive with a partner.

PezCachers, Jill and Ken, created the geocache.

They say, “We enjoy placing caches that have some sort of history to them and are fun to find. GCJ9YK is a fine example of that. When we placed the cache in 2004, there were very few underwater caches and we thought it would be fun to see how many geocachers were divers. Turns out there are a lot! Thanks for bringing attention to the great legend who gave us a vision and the key to the silent world.”

PezCachers asks three questions before you’re able to claim the cache. Beside answering to those questions at this Virtual Cache, you’ll also discover much more: wrecks, drop-offs and come face to face with countless colorful fish.

Explore all the Geocaches of the Week here.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Virtual Caches are no longer available for creation on Geocaching.com.  These types of caches are now considered waymarks on Waymarking.com.

Groundspeak Weekly Newsletter 7/16/2010

Five Important Things to Know Before Placing a Geocache

There are now more than 1.1 million active geocaches around the world. The most exciting geocaching experiences come from fun, creative and challenging geocaches. If you would like to add your own cache to the growing tally, here are five important things to consider before you get started.

1. The more experience you have finding caches, the better you will be at knowing what makes a great hide. So, get out there and find a bunch of caches before you consider hiding your own.

2. Review the guidelines for placing a geocache. They are fundamental to ensuring that your cache can be listed on Geocaching.com.

3. Geocaches cannot be placed within 1/10th of a mile (161 m) of one another. Visit www.geocaching.com/seek and conduct a search for caches in the area that you have chosen for your cache. If the area is saturated with geocaches, you may want to consider a more unique location.

4. A volunteer reviewer looks at each new geocache listing before it is published on Geocaching.com. Work with your local reviewer. They are highly experienced geocachers and may have follow-up questions or advice that will help expedite the review process.

5. Owning a geocache requires an ongoing commitment. Maintenance requirements include upkeep of the container, replacing the logbook and addressing any unforeseen problems. If you want to place a geocache, make sure that the area is accessible to you so that you can fulfill this obligation.

Find more information about placing a geocache in the Groundspeak Knowledge Books.

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Travel Bug Rescue – Learn from a Pro

Scott Stracener, Me2Ugly, rescuing a Travel Bug.

Scott Stracener is geocacher Me2Ugly.  You may recognize his name if you’ve ever had a Travel Bug in need of rescue.  He’s currently ranked among the best of the best in Travel Bug rescue. Scott talked to us about how you can request assistance in rescuing your wayward Travel Bug or become a rescuer yourself.

Latitude 47: How did you hear about Travel Bug rescue?

Scott: I found out about TB Rescue through Geocaching.com.  I was just clicking around the site and saw a banner ad.  I clicked on the banner to get more information.  I thought that it was a great idea and a great way to get more involved with geocaching.  I know I would like someone to grab my Travel Bug or coin and move it along.  This gives us a way to help fellow cachers and to connect with others on a more personal note.

The long road to rescue. Me2Ugly treks up a California road to rescue a Travel Bug.

Latitude 47: What is your most gratifying recovery?

Scott: Most gratifying rescue, there are two.  Obviously, my first successful rescue.  TB2ECQA ‘Geocoin Club June 2008’.  The coin was dropped on 11/4/2009. The owner requested a rescue on 3/12/2010, 128 days after the drop.  I saw the request on 3/15 and went out the next morning, hiked up Sugarloaf Mountain to retrieve the coin.  I then took it to the ‘Un-Original Stash’ in Oregon, which is where my most memorable TB Rescue took place.

TB346VW ‘KC The Traveling Gorilla’, created by a mother for her son to watch the Travel Bug move from cache to cache.  KC was dropped on 1/31/10 and the mother requested a rescue on 4/21/10.  My investigation of the TB showed that it had only been active for two months and was already stuck.  I was going to be in the neighborhood (Un-Original Stash) so I [thought, “I] will stop by the last known cache for the Travel Bug.”  On 4/25/10, I found the cache and rescued the Travel Bug.  I had already decided that if I found the Travel Bug I would take it to the Project A.P.E. cache Mission 9: Tunnel of Light.  For the next month I kept KC The Traveling Gorilla and took him on a number of cache hunts, a Cache Rescue (which I do when requested through WSGA) and even a TB-Rescue on the Olympic Peninsula that was unsuccessful.  On 5/24/10, I dropped KC The Traveling Gorilla at Mission 9.  Then, when finishing the Geo TRIAD at HQ, I spotted KC there.  That was cool.

Latitude 47: What advice do you have if someone is interested in Travel Bug rescue?

Scott: Know the area where the rescue will take place.  No Travel Bug Rescue is worth risking yourself or property.  Have fun and remember that not all rescues can be successful.  However, when they are, it really feels great.

Latitude 47: Have you ever lost a Travel Bug?

Scott: I have not lost a Travel Bug.  I do not have that many out there.  I do know I will launch one on July 17th near Fort Casey on Whidbey Island, WA.  It will be my grandson’s second birthday.