Where Bats Dare — Geocache of the Week

Mystery
GC1N065
by toczygroszek
Difficulty:
1.5
Terrain:
4
Location:
Dublin, Ireland
N 53° 21.762′ W 006° 04.286

Tucked into the cliffs on the Irish eastern coast lies a cave, and within it, this Geocache of the Week. With a title like, Where Bats Dare, where else would this geocache be located?

Perhaps another title for this cache could be Where Batty Geocachers Dare, because this T4 Mystery Cache requires ample preparation, research, and equipment to access safely. Geocachers who attempt this cache should pay strict attention to the ebb and flow tides. At high tide the cave fills with water. Giving you only a two hour window to get in and get out before the treacherous tide rushes back in.

The entrance is located at sea level on the side of a cliff. You will lose GPS signal immediately upon entering the cave and will have to use your best geosenses to poke around the dark and wet rocks. At the end of the abyss lies the treasure, a small tupperware container.

 

What to bring:

  • Flashlight or headlamp
  • Waterproof boots (Be prepared to get wet!)
  • Warm clothes
  • Friend/fellow geocacher (do not do this cache alone)

The cave is also home to sensitive fauna and flora which may excite you or frighten you! But like most areas with a sensitive ecosystem, the cache owner reminds us to not disturb the environment inside.

What geocachers had to say:

This cache caught our attention when we were planning the trip to Ireland! Equipped with the tides table, we decided the afternoon would be the best opportunity!

Entered the site at the western beach, since we were traveling counter-clockwise. We had fun climbing over large rocks and little pools, until we arrived at the cave Exchanged our walking-shoes for Crocs, and went straight through the puddle towards the cave.

Thanks to the detailed description, we found the box and logged the find. The water would still recede a bit more while we were on our way, it was fun to watch it! Thanks for this great cache, which deserves a favorite point.

Neo777

Well this was some adventure! And, of course, somewhere I would never have seen if not for geocaching and toczygroszek. So first off, a big thanks to the CO for the hide and the waypoints. I parked on Ceanchor Road and followed the track to path 1. From there it was straightforward.

I was at sea level over an hour before low tide so I was in no great hurry. I sat at the cave entrance and removed my walking boots, preferring bare feet for the water pool and the business in the cave. I found no obvious signs of life in the main cave or the side passage other than a couple of pigeons near the entrance.

KowaiBaz

A word from the Cache Owner toczygroszek:

“In my opinion Howth Summit is the most beautiful area in Dublin, so I decided place there something special. While looking for a spot to hide a geocache, I found few interesting caves. Most of the caves are only accessible on the low tide. One of them was perfect for geocache.

As the cache type is mystery, I supposed that it would only be found by locals. But after a few logs I realized that many tourists were visiting the cache. And I find that amazing, because you have to prepare before — you have to check a tide time, use torch (flashlight) and have good boots. Now, it’s probably the most popular cave in Dublin 🙂 I’m really happy that people enjoy the cave and can discover wild part of Dublin.

Continue to explore some of the most amazing geocaches around the world.
Check out all of the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog. If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, fill out this form.

People from all over Europe and the world
4 Comments

“You have to be odd to be number one” — First of each geocache type

“You have to be odd to be number one”
— Dr. Seuss

The first to be something, now that’s something. Although a few of these geocaches are open for a spirited discussion, we’re fairly confident these are the “firsts” for each geocache type. Keep in mind that in the early days of geocaching, it was easier to change cache types after publication. Nevertheless, these geocaches should be fairly “pure”. Check out our list:

First Traditional Geocache

The Original Stash
GCF
May 3, 2000
Oregon, USA

Dave Ulmer's original description
Dave Ulmer’s original description restored from the sci.geo.satellite-nav newsgroup.
Dave Ulmer at location of The Original Stash
Dave Ulmer at location of The Original Stash when the tribute plaque was installed

First Mystery Cache

Octopus Garden
GC70
October 30, 2000
North Carolina, USA

The reason for the name of the Mystery Cache
The reason for the name of the Mystery Cache
The contents found in the first Mystery Cache
The contents found in the first Mystery Cache

First Multi-Cache

Tour of Stone Mountain
GC1E
June 11, 2000
Georgia, USA

And here it was, deep in the woods of Georgia
And here it was, deep in the woods of Georgia
Nice use of the ammo can for the world's first Multi-Cache
Nice use of the ammo can for the world’s first Multi-Cache

First Virtual Cache

Rift Valley
GC53
6/15/2000 (The user carved his initials in a tree, years prior and listed it as a virtual cache in September of 2000, backdating to June of 2000. It’s possible that “Virtual Dublin” GC60 may be the true first.)
Kenya 

Driving to the world's first Virtual Cache in Kenya
Driving to the world’s first Virtual Cache in Kenya
Virtually amazing?
Virtually amazing?

First Letterbox Hybrid

Open Space 6
GC190
1/15/2001 (This one is the most difficult to confirm. GC2D is the oldest Letterbox Hybrid in the database, but it was never found. It’s possible it was changed to a Letterbox Hybrid after the fact.)
New Mexico, USA

En route to the Letterbox Hybrid
En route to the Letterbox Hybrid
En route to the Letterbox Hybrid
En route to the Letterbox Hybrid

 

First Event Cache

Austin Geocachers Happy Hour
GC389
March 24, 2001
Texas, USA

The first Event Cache was a rousing success
The first Event Cache was a rousing success

First Webcam Cache

Houston Webcam Cache #1
GC21DF
October 11, 2001
Texas, USA

Remember dial-up modems and websites that looked like this?
Remember dial-up modems and websites that looked like this?
Webcam image. No bull.
Webcam image. No bull.

First Locationless Cache

Please Donate Blood Cache
GC1C90
September 12, 2001
Locationless—duh! 

Blood, sweat, and cache
Blood, sweat, and cache
<3
<3

First Cache In Trash Out® (CITO)

Earth Day Cleanup at Raccoon Creek Park
GCE2F1
April 26, 2003
Pennsylvania, USA

The original CITO gang
The original CITO gang
That is a successful haul for a CITO
That is a successful haul for a CITO

First EarthCache

Earthcache I – a simple geology tour of Wasp Head
GCHFT2
January 10, 2004 (other EarthCaches have earlier GC codes, but they were retroactively changed to EarthCaches from other cache types)
New South Wales, Australia

This EarthCache rocks!
This EarthCache rocks!
Get one with nature with an EarthCache
Get one with nature with an EarthCache

First Mega-Event Cache

GeoWoodstock 4
GCRRC6
May 27, 2006
Texas, USA

The first ever Mega-Event had great weather
The first ever Mega-Event had great weather
If you were at the first Mega-Event, you remember these guys
If you were at the first Mega-Event, you remember these guys

First Wherigo

Where I went, Hugo
GC18FP7
January 9, 2008
London, UK

YOU SHALL MAYBE PASS
YOU SHALL MAYBE PASS
Whereveryougo, sign that logbook!
Whereveryougo, sign that logbook!

First Giga-Event

Project MUNICH2014 – Mia san Giga!
GC4K089
August 16, 2014
Bayern, Germany

Setting up for the GIGA!
Setting up for the GIGA!
People from all over Europe and the world
People from all over Europe and the world
Good fun for everyone
Good fun for everyone

What do you think of our list? Do you know of geocaches that may qualify as “geocaching firsts”?

K&K LOST Train

K&K LOST Train — Geocache of the Week

Traditional
GC2J0H0
by K&K
Difficulty:
2
Terrain:
1.5
Location:
Egypt
N 27° 22.616 E 033° 39.778
K&K LOST Train
K&K LOST Train

El Gouna is a completely man-made tourist resort located in eastern Egypt on the Red Sea. There you will find golfing, horseback riding, scuba diving, windsurfing, kitesurfing, waterskiing, parasailing, and snorkeling. There are two main beaches, Zeytuna and Mangroovy, which attract tourists sun-seeking from around the world. El Gouna is known as the “Little Venice of Egypt” due to the canals that allow each house to have its own strip of “beach” even if you may be quite far inland.

Egyptian tuk tuk
Egyptian tuk tuk

But just 10 minutes outside of this luxurious area, you will find something very different: an old train left stranded in the desert.

Skeleton crew
Skeleton crew

Talk about lost places. There are just two dirty, rusted, and battered train cars covered in graffiti. The tracks start at a pile of bricks, go under the cars, then simply end in the middle of nowhere. The rails are just long enough for the two cars to sit upon, plus a dozen sleepers (the wood beams that run perpendicular to the rails).

Weather worn
Weather worn

The most likely scenario is that this train was part of a line that was shut down due to maintenance or repair issues, and it was easier to leave these cars here than to haul them to another location. However, accurate information about this train is difficult to, ahem, “track” down. 😉

Tracks to nowhere
Tracks to nowhere

The train cars conjure up images of an era full of romance, mystery, and adventure. If they could only talk and tell us where they have been, what they have seen, and where they wish to go.

Last call
Last call

But that part is up to you, geocachers. Where will you go next to find romance, mystery, adventure, and maybe a geocache?

"Track" ables?
“Track” ables?
Chugga chugga choo choo
Chugga chugga choo choo
The sun is setting on this train
The sun is setting on this train
The end of a day, and an era
The end of a day, and an era

Continue to explore some of the most amazing geocaches around the world.
Check out all of the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog. If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, fill out this form.

Soak it all in
1 Comment

Geocaching a geothermal geocache (GC25643)—Geocache of the Week

EarthCache
GC25643
by goldohulk
Difficulty:
1.5
Terrain:
1.5
Location:
Iceland
N 63° 52.810 W 022° 26.976
Iceland's Blue Lagoon
Iceland’s Blue Lagoon

No doubt if you plan to visit Iceland, you will probably plan to work a visit to the Blue Lagoon into your itinerary. With its otherworldly landscape, promoted benefits to your health, and mix of rugged rocks and modern architecture, it’s obvious to see why it’s the country’s top destination.

You don’t need to enter the spa to log this EarthCache. But if you do, know that the waters are rich in minerals, and bathing in the Blue Lagoon is reputed to help people suffering from skin diseases such as psoriasis. The temperature in the bathing and swimming areas of the lagoon are warm to quite steamy-hot. The Blue Lagoon also operates a research and development facility to help find cures for other skin ailments using the mineral-rich water.

No need to enter the spa to log this EarthCache
No need to enter the spa to log this EarthCache

How did this come to be? In 1976, a pool of wastewater formed near the geothermal power plant that had just been built. In 1981, people started bathing in it after its supposed healing powers were popularized. In 1992, the Blue Lagoon company was established, and the bathing facility was opened for the public.

So no, the Blue Lagoon is not a natural phenomenon; it’s actually created by the runoff from the nearby geothermal plant. But it’s fascinating, nevertheless. Check out what some geocachers have to say about this geothermal geocache:

EarthCache logging is tough business
EarthCache logging is tough business

Diabolic27
Brilliant trip. Went in 54 yrs old and emerged a mere 21(again). Well worth a visit.

Soapy Joe
Well the sun actually came out today, for the first time during our trip. What an odd feeling to be bobbing away in warm water when the air temperature was 3 degrees! Made the sprint to the changing rooms even colder than normal! Thank for placing this cache at this iconic location. TFTC

Beinhart
We had already visited a geothermal plant, so we knew what is done here. It is fascinating that a company uses the geothermal power, can sell electricity and hot water and that they can even make money from the “waste” (the used water) by building a bath, a hotel and by selling beauty products and other stuff under the name “Blue Lagoon”.

Hot spot in the lagoon are near the steam vents
Hot spot in the lagoon are near the steam vents
Yup. It's cold outside the spa!
Yup. It’s cold outside the spa!
Now THAT'S a wet bar!
Now THAT’S a wet bar!
Mud mask
Mud mask
Mud mask
Mud mask
Soak it all in
Soak it all in

Continue to explore some of the most amazing geocaches around the world.
Check out all of the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog. If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, fill out this form.